Category: Corum


Corum Admiral cup replica

Corum Admiral cup is a Swiss watchmaker that has been around since 1955. This brand is known for its innovative watches—bold, elegant designs that continue to be popular today.

If you’d like to know more about this luxury brand, read on. This article will let you in on some of the most important things to know about Corum like its history, collections, and reputation. We’ll also give information on where you can purchase Corum watches.
The company was founded in La Chaux de Fonds, a town in the Swiss Jura mountains discovered in 1656, which became a popular location for the watchmaking industry (and later became a UNESCO World Heritage Site).

Since 1955, the House of Corum Admiral cup has been located in La Chaux de Fonds. The company is currently owned by Eterna and Hong Kong-based Citychamp Watch & Jewellery Group Limited.

One of the first watches produced by the brand is the “Chinese Hat” which has a pyramid-shaped bezel that evoked the same shape as the hats worn in China at the time.

Another is the Admiral (which first came out in 1960), a square watch with an engraving of a sailboat at the back. There’s also the Coin watch, released four years later, which is equipped with an ultra-thin movement set in a gold coin.

Corum has four collections: The Admiral, Golden Bridge, Bubble, and Heritage. We’ll take a close look at each of these below, and talk about some of the brand’s most popular models.
As mentioned above, the first Corum Admiral cup watch was introduced in 1960. This watch easily became one of the brand’s most popular models, and according to the Corum website, paving the way for the company’s success.

One of the things that inspired the collection is sailing. The Admiral’s Cup race took place is 1957, and the first watch was introduced in 1960. The current collection has a wide array of models, all of which have a similar look (it no longer has the square shape that was first released). Today’s Admiral collection has a dodecagonal (12-sided) case, with different shapes, materials, and movements).

One popular model is the automatic Admiral AC-One 45 Tides, a 45mm watch with a titanium grade 5 case, with a double anti-reflective sapphire crystal. The first Admiral Tides was released in 1993 and was powered by the exclusive Corum movement CO277, with up to 42 hours of power reserve. This watch also has the same movement, as well as information on the lunar cycle, and times and strength of the tides. The dial is brass, with features like a white superluminova dauphine hour and minute hands and seconds baton hands with a Corum key design.

The collection also has smaller models, such as the 38mm Admiral Legend 38, which has a CO 082 automatic movement and stainless steel, 5N 18kt rose gold case. This also has a version with diamonds on the case with a white alligator strap.
This is arguably one of Corum’s most unique watch collections. The Golden Bridge Collection is composed of watches with four sapphire sides that show an intricate linear movement. This avant-garde watch has the movement placed on the center of the transparent case—”a perfect miniature version of the signature Californian landmark,” according to Corum.

The Corum Golden Bridge Round 43 (as in 43mm), this watch has a CO 113 hand-wound movement, which the wearer would be able to get a 60° view because of the open case. This watch has models with an 18k rose gold case, with or without diamonds.

There are also rectangular versions, like the Corum Golden Bridge Rectangle (29.50 x 42.20 mm), with a white gold case, an alligator bracelet. This design has been used by Corum since the 1980s. There’s also a rose gold version.

The recent models were refined by designer Dino Modolo, a watch powered by the CO 112 hand-wound movement and is the only watch in the market with an in-line baguette movement, which has parts stacked in a column shape. This line also has tourbillon watches (a tonneau-shaped Corum Golden Bridge Tourbillon Panoramique), which has a Featuring 360° visibility, appearing as if it’s weightless at the center of the watch.

For those who are looking for a smaller size, there’s the Miss Golden Bridge, a more feminine model with a 21.30mm x 43.99mm case made with 5N 18kt rose gold. This one’s available with both a rose gold and leather bracelet and has versions with diamonds on the case.
The company refers to the Bubble Collection as “Corum’s fun timepieces.” A Corum Bubble watch, which is is oversized with a large crystal, was introduced in 2000 and was available for around five years. It made a comeback in 2015 after the company continued to receive inquiries even after a decade of not having any new releases.
This collection shows that Corum can produce playful designs, retaining accurate movements. One of the watches from this like includes the Bubble 47 Central Tourbillon, a 47mm watch with a domed titanium case and a brass dial, with a vulcanized rubber bracelet. This model runs on the CO 406 Automatic movement with up to 65 hours of power reserve.

The Bubble is also the collection that the brand is able to incorporate pop culture designs. The Big Bubble Magical Elisabetta Fantone, for instance, is a 52mm piece with a Salvador Dali design on the dial and a vulcanized rubber bracelet. There are also a number of models with a skull design, like the Big Bubble Magical 3D Skull, a 52mm watch with a titanium grade 5 with a black PVD treatment case, and a vulcanized rubber bracelet. This watch does not have hour/minute/second hand markers—instead, the time is marked by red circles on the dial.

The collection also includes a collaboration with DJ and composer Matteo Ceccarini. The Corum Big Bubble Magical 52 Anima is an automatic watch with a 52mm case and a vulcanized rubber bracelet. On the dial is an eye design (or this, and there are minimalist round markers on the outer layer of the watch. A similar model is the Corum Big Bubble Magical 52 Earth.
The Corum Heritage Collection is composed of watches that reflect the brand’s history and creativity.

This collection includes the famous Coin watch, which watch was released in 1964. The watch has a $20 Double dial and became popular with prominent figures (this article by Watchtime mentions that seven American presidents have reportedly owned a Coin watch). Powered by a CO 082 – Automatic with a 42-hour power reserve, this watch has a 43mm yellow gold case and a dial with the American Double Eagle gold coin. There is also the unique engraved model by artist Aleksey Saburov, who created “hobo coins,” which are coins that are reworked by carving with a new design. This watch, according to this article, was presented by Saburov and Corum in Baselworld 2018.

The Heritage Collection also includes the Heritage Eleganza line, which has a feminine style. According to Corum Ceo Jerome Biard, the idea behind Eleganza was “to create a model that was both precious and contemporary.” Fitted with the CO 254 Automatic movement, this is a 40mm watch with diamonds on the bezel and dial. There’s a total of six Eleganza models and colors to choose from.

One of the newer models from the Heritage collection is the Heritage Corum Lab 01 line of watches, which have an experimental style and aesthetic, unlike what the brand has done with its classic Coin and Golden Bridge collections. These watches have a barrel-shaped titanium case (39.89mm x 55 mm), a CO 410 Automatic movement, a sapphire crystal, and an open-worked dial.
Corum is respected by watch collectors and aficionados. The luxury brand is known all over the world for its high-quality watches and limited-edition releases, with the $20 Liberty Eagle Coin watch being one of the most popular and sought-after models.
In 2013, the company was bought by Hong Kong-based Citychamp Watch & Jewellery Group, which also runs two of the biggest watch brands in China (Rossini and Ebohr).

In a 2016 interview with Corum’s Davide Traxler, the former CEO said that Corum was growing in Asia, in countries like Hong Kong, Singapore, and Malaysia.
Corum is a well-regarded watchmaker known for its unique watch designs with impressive technical features. The company combines “creativity and boldness” as two of its guiding principles in watchmaking.
Corum is a regular topic on forums such as this one, with many agreeing that one of the brand’s best releases is the Golden Bridge, which has a stunning design. There are mixed reviews of the more modern and daring models like the Bubble collection.

Corum Admiral 42 Automatic Chronograph

Founded in 1955, Corum Admiral 42 Automatic Chronograph is renowned for his limited-edition watches. Every year, Corum unveils new creative variations of their well-known collection. The automatic Golden Bridge was always a conversation starter between watch aficionados. The Corum Bubble’s free expressivity was pushed to the level of a contest – “Customizeyourbubble”, where the most creative Instagram user could win a Corum Bubble. Another loved collection is the Admiral’s Cup. The sailing inspired watches are a signature collection of Corum and a must have for the brand’s fans. The association between Corum and the Admiral’s Club ended this year, but Corum continued with the collection under the name Admiral. We review today one of the latest addition, the Admiral AC-One 45 Chronograph, Reference number A116/03210.
The brand from La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland, released the Admiral’s Cup in 1960. The Admiral’s Cup is an international yachting regatta started in 1957. The Admiral’s Cup watches evolved from an initial square shaped case to now a twelve-sided design. The Admiral’s Cup AC-One 45 Bois was released in 2015. The novelty of these watches was the natural Teak wood dial. The nautical heritage of the collection was enriched with the warmth of natural wood. With the association between Corum and the Admiral’s Cup ended late last year, Corum continued with this wood theme on their latest bronze cased, wood dialed edition under the revamped line simply called Admira.
Corum Admiral AC-One 45, Ref. A116/03210 comes with a new material for case – bronze and wooden ange dial. This material is not tipically used by Corum for watch cases. The brand has a rich history of precious materials and stainless steel. Bronze is a bold choice and gives an original look, unique for each owner. The bronze develops a nice patina over time, sometimes spectacular. Some of the users even speed up the process by using chemicals. An advantage to take into consideration is that bronze can clean up really well. But most of the bronze fans take pride in developing their own formula to hasten the process. Even our reviewed piece has an interesting appearance, but the patina is natural.

The case has a generous size of 45mm diameter and a thickness of 14.3mm. The complex shape reveals a multilayered construction with alternating materials. The case is not entirely made of bronze. Corum used, as in the previous model, two brown inlays between the bezel, the case body and back-case. This not only makes the transition between one element to another but also continues as part of the crown protection. Moreover, the symmetrical shape is broken by the right-side crown protection. This design element is not subtle, and in our eyes, improves the technical aesthetics for a stronger appearance of the Admiral AC-One 45.
Another element where Corum Admiral 42 Automatic Chronograph expended considerable effort is the bezel. The front side roundness is chamfered into a dodecagonal shape. The same shape is found on the double anti-reflective sapphire crystal. The crystal slightly overflows the height of the case, creating an even more, three-dimensional shape. The visual effect is simply phenomenal, particularly considering how hard it is to obtain unusual crystal shapes. The screw in the case-back has the same design as in the older models revealing the calibre CO116 through a sapphire crystal.

The crown was not forgotten. Two rows of rectangularly shaped grips not only that enhance the crown’s usage but have an excellent visual appearance. Due to higher usage, the engraving that tends to catch more oxidation and dust, the crown will have in time a more accentuated patina, as the rest of the case.
The watch’s size sounds like it’s going to wear very large, at least on paper. But due to the intricate design, the watch seats well on the wrist. Even a smaller wrist, used to more classical sizes will have no issues with the Admiral watch. Corum deserves praise for how they handled this case.

The case offers 300 meters of water resistance, as expected for a nautically themed timepiece. Our reviewed piece, still a prototype at the photo-shooting time, has an engraving with 100m water resistance. But Corum assured us that the final and official specification is a 300m water resistance.

For the dial, Corum decided to go again with wood as the choice of material. The wooden ange gives a very engaging view of the watch. The warmth of the dial completes the overall aspect and complements the aged bronze case beautifully. It will be interesting to see, in time, how this will evolve. But the choice of bronze and wood is hardly bizarre. It stems from the maritime origins of the Admiral watch. We find this combination quite often in traditional seafaring vessels.

As a special call sign for the Admiral series, the hour markers are applied coloured nautical flags. The appliques are rhodium plated and printed with the flags by ink transfer. These elements come with a refreshing look, making the dial more enjoyable adding to the vibrance of the textured brown of the wood dial.
The hour and minute hands are rhodium plated with faceted finish. They are skeletonized, which in our view is a good decision. The hands are designed to have a generous width and have the tip finished with SuperLuminova. The central seconds’ hand is baton shaped with the Corum logo as counter-weight.

The date window is discreetly placed at 6 o’clock and is enhanced by a rhodium plated border. The white on black digits looks a bit out of the place in the scheme of things. Perhaps the choice of the colour scheme is not the happiest one.

The sporty feel of the dial fits very well the case. The entire look is pleasant and quite engaging. The watch comes with a brown “Mad Max” leather strap, treated specially to be salt water resistant.
The Corum Admiral AC-One 45 uses the same calibre CO116 as the previous models. This is expected since it is the same collection and the novelties come from other points. The movement has the typical modern characteristics like the 4Hz balance wheel and the 42 hours of power reserve. The Calibre CO116 uses an ETA calibre as a base, with a Dubois Dépraz chronograph module. Everything seems to be done flawlessly as the manipulation of the timing functions is nice and clean, with only minor visible jumps of the hands when the function is engaged, which is typical of such module chronographs.
The movement itself is kept almost hidden under the bespoke rotor weight. The skeletonized rotor plays peek-a-boo, and as it moves let parts of the movement to be visible with its nicely executed perlage. While the movement was clearly not decorated for visual impact, it redeems itself nicely. The oscillating weight features a smooth circular brushing and chamfered “windows”. The brand’s name and logo is engraved, just to remind the allegiance.
Corum Admiral AC-One 45 is priced moderately at S$16,585 (inclusive of GST). For this price, the market offers enough chronograph competitors. But the marine constellation of chronometers in bronze cases is poorly represented.

A lovely chronograph in bronze with 100m water resistance and with a price of US$7,100 is the spectacular Zenith Heritage Pilot Extra Special Chronograph. The watch was released pre-Baselworld 2017 and is a version of the Zenith Heritage Pilot Cafe Racer. The watch sports a 45mm diameter case with engraved solid titanium case-back. Typical for a pilot watch, the Pilot features big luminescent numerals with a nicely done rail-road seconds scale, but it lacks the date function. The gold-plated hands increase the black dial’s appealing and the over all aeronautic style is a nice touch. The Pilot Extra Special is powered by the Calibre El Primero 4069 – a column wheel chrono with 5Hz balance wheel and 50 hours of power reserve. The main difference stays in the Pilot’s classic design that it shows his real size, being not the obvious choice for a smaller wrist.
IWC Aquatimer Chronograph Edition “Expedition Charles Darwin” was released in 2014. The Aquatimer shares many similarities with our reviewed piece. The 44mm diameter case is a little bit thicker, 16.9mm the IWC versus the 14.3mm of the Corum. Mostly satin brushed, the bronze case has some design elements which removes the classic boredom of a round shape. Interesting is the internal display rotating bezel with SafeDive system, specific to diver watches. The watch features a black dial with vertical layout and date window. The self-winding calibre 89365 has the advantage of the “in-house” tag for the price and flyback chrono function.
Corum Admiral AC-One 45 is an interesting watch with a bold personality. Perhaps polarising due to its size and case material, the Admiral is more a “love it or hate it” piece. We noted the clever case design enables a good fit on the wrist and perhaps masks the generous size. As a sailing watch, it is a bit out in the water, so to speak as it lacks functionality typically required of a regatta watch. But the charms of the natural wood texture will write love stories between the boats’ fans. The bronze patina will leave, in time, unmatched and unique signs that will personalise the watch in a way known only by the owner. A reason for pride, in our opinion. Corum Admiral 42 Automatic Chronograph fits perfectly his nautical theme.

Corum Admiral 42 Automatic Watch

Launched in 1960, the Admiral is one of the most emblematic creations of Corum. Based in La Chaux-de-Fonds, the Swiss brand was founded only 5 years earlier. Since its introduction, the Admiral collection has always showcased strong links to the nautical world. This is also the case of the latest model of this iconic line, the Corum Admiral 42 Automatic Bronze.
A material that was often used in old ships, bronze is a saltwater-resistant alloy that develops a characteristic patina over time, thus making each piece somehow unique. In order to be as homogeneous as possible over time, the 42 mm case and its dodecagonal bezel has been enhanced by a unique satin-brushed finishing.

Available in navy blue or maritime green, the dial of the Admiral 42 Automatic Bronze features the 12 pennant-shaped hour markers, typical of the line. Equipped with a Corum automatic movement visible through the sapphire case back, the watch features a small second at 6 o’clock and a date at 3 o’clock.
When it comes to Corum, most watch folks would probably call to mind the iconic Bubble line, or perhaps the Golden Bridge line. Those are certainly iconic in their own right, but they’re fairly “recent” additions to the catalog. If you want to go a bit further back, say, to the 1960s, then you’re talking about the Admiral collection. As you might expect, this line is particularly influenced by the water, ships, and sailing. While they come in a variety of sizes, and you have some options with complications, today, we’re keeping it simple with a look at the Corum Admiral 42 Automatic.
First, a quick note of clarification around the name. Throughout this article, we’ll be calling the watch the Corum Admiral Legend 42. Yet, a cursory glance at the dial shows that it’s called the Admiral’s Cup. So, what gives? In asking about it, it seems that the brand uses both names interchangeably, and they are the same watch. So, if you find the Admiral’s Cup, it’s not appreciably some different watch than the Corum Admiral Legend 42. Therefore, we’ve gone with the name that matches what you’ll find on Corum’s site.
As you might suspect by the name of the watch, the Corum Admiral Legend 42 comes in (wait for it) a tidy 42mm diameter. Though, to see that you’d have to have one greatly calibrated eye – the case itself takes the form of a dodecagon (twelve sided). Apart from being a way to distinguish this watch, visually and immediately, from others, it lays the groundwork for the dial itself. You see, that dial, that is really where the Corum Admiral Legend 42 really shines (well, sure the case shines, but that’s because it’s polished).
You see, with the dial the Corum Admiral Legend 42 brings the mizzenmast (that’s a yachting term, right?) to your wrist, in the form of signal flags that make up the indices. This is more than just a silly way to add some color and nautical flair to the watch. No, you see, those flags? They are actually conforming to the International Code of Signals (ICS) for indicating numbers using flags. This is pretty straightforward with the single digits, and then the double-digits just split the pennant in two to have the two digits indicated. While I may not be a boater myself, I like this, as it’s a clever way to integrate the theme, while giving people who really know their stuff something a bit more “hidden in plain sight” to grab on to.
Looking at the dial, something was putting my eye at unease, and I couldn’t place why, at least at first. Then I realized (quickly, thankfully) that not only was the center section (think of it as the wire the flags hang off of) not circular, it’s not even symmetrical (thanks to the date window). One presumes that this was done solely for the sub-seconds (which is more prominent here than on most watches). It also makes one pause to think about an enterprising customizer going with a Fiona Krüger-esque sugar skull there in the center. But I guess that’s more biker and car culture than it is for the marina set.
But I digress. While the number of patterns and colors on the dial of the Corum Admiral Legend 42 could make for a particularly busy watch, it works. Realistically, aside from the white (which is what the dial is, primarily), you’ve only got four other colors – red, blue, yellow, and black. These are all in small doses, and allow the other aspects – the angles, the circular grooves, and the like, to shine through. There is a lot going on with the dial, but it never felt too busy, or presented a problem with telling the time (hey, even the hands are flags – sort of).
For a dial as legible and interesting as the one on the Corum Admiral 42 Automatic, it’s not going to be worth a barnacle if it isn’t accurate. I wasn’t about to put the the watch on a Timegrapher (left it in my other pants), but I had no issues with being on time throughout my day. The watch is driven by what Corum calls the CO395 movement, which starts off with a base ETA 2895, and puts some additional decoration and a custom rotor into the mix. Given the solid ETA base, one would presume that reliability, accuracy, and maintainability shouldn’t be a problem.
Fittingly, for a watch as water-themed as the Corum Admiral Legend 42 (and yet still managing to not be a dive watch), it comes on a rubber strap with folding clasp. With the rubber, you get a strap that’s snugging right into those angles on the case, which makes for a tight look. It also means, if you like swapping out watch straps, you’re going to be stuck with just the stock option, or possibly getting a NATO to work. Anything else, and that case gap will ruin you.
On the flip side of that water-based coin, it’s surprising that the Corum Admiral Legend 42 only carries a 50m water resistance rating. Now, I’m not expecting some depth-crushing 500m rating, or something like that. I would just hope that a watch, that would seem to be most at home on the deck of a boat, would carry at least a 100m rating, so as to better keep things safe should you take a dive into the blue.
Then again, perhaps the Corum Admiral Legend 42 is aimed more at those who captain a desk, like myself, and want to be reminded more of the water’s call. In that case, yeah, the watch works great. In an office environment (or, say, out to a nice dinner) the mostly-white dial paired with the high polish of the case makes for a nice, dressy piece. Find yourself in a funkier setting? Well, the random (to the untrained eye) patterns at the indices liven things up. And yeah, even though I griped about the water resistance rating, it certainly is enough to cover you in your day to day (just don’t get crazy in the water with it).

Corum Admiral 42 Chronograph

When it comes to Corum, most watch folks would probably call to mind the iconic Bubble line, or perhaps the Golden Bridge line. Those are certainly iconic in their own right, but they’re fairly “recent” additions to the catalog. If you want to go a bit further back, say, to the 1960s, then you’re talking about the Admiral collection. As you might expect, this line is particularly influenced by the water, ships, and sailing. While they come in a variety of sizes, and you have some options with complications, today, we’re keeping it simple with a look at the Corum Admiral Legend 42.
First, a quick note of clarification around the name. Throughout this article, we’ll be calling the watch the Corum Admiral Legend 42. Yet, a cursory glance at the dial shows that it’s called the Admiral’s Cup. So, what gives? In asking about it, it seems that the brand uses both names interchangeably, and they are the same watch. So, if you find the Admiral’s Cup, it’s not appreciably some different watch than the Corum Admiral Legend 42. Therefore, we’ve gone with the name that matches what you’ll find on Corum’s site.
As you might suspect by the name of the watch, the Corum Admiral Legend 42 comes in (wait for it) a tidy 42mm diameter. Though, to see that you’d have to have one greatly calibrated eye – the case itself takes the form of a dodecagon (twelve sided). Apart from being a way to distinguish this watch, visually and immediately, from others, it lays the groundwork for the dial itself. You see, that dial, that is really where the Corum Admiral Legend 42 really shines (well, sure the case shines, but that’s because it’s polished).
You see, with the dial the Corum Admiral Legend 42 brings the mizzenmast (that’s a yachting term, right?) to your wrist, in the form of signal flags that make up the indices. This is more than just a silly way to add some color and nautical flair to the watch. No, you see, those flags? They are actually conforming to the International Code of Signals (ICS) for indicating numbers using flags. This is pretty straightforward with the single digits, and then the double-digits just split the pennant in two to have the two digits indicated. While I may not be a boater myself, I like this, as it’s a clever way to integrate the theme, while giving people who really know their stuff something a bit more “hidden in plain sight” to grab on to.
Looking at the dial, something was putting my eye at unease, and I couldn’t place why, at least at first. Then I realized (quickly, thankfully) that not only was the center section (think of it as the wire the flags hang off of) not circular, it’s not even symmetrical (thanks to the date window). One presumes that this was done solely for the sub-seconds (which is more prominent here than on most watches). It also makes one pause to think about an enterprising customizer going with a Fiona Krüger-esque sugar skull there in the center. But I guess that’s more biker and car culture than it is for the marina set.
But I digress. While the number of patterns and colors on the dial of the Corum Admiral Legend 42 could make for a particularly busy watch, it works. Realistically, aside from the white (which is what the dial is, primarily), you’ve only got four other colors – red, blue, yellow, and black. These are all in small doses, and allow the other aspects – the angles, the circular grooves, and the like, to shine through. There is a lot going on with the dial, but it never felt too busy, or presented a problem with telling the time (hey, even the hands are flags – sort of).
For a dial as legible and interesting as the one on the Corum Admiral Legend 42, it’s not going to be worth a barnacle if it isn’t accurate. I wasn’t about to put the the watch on a Timegrapher (left it in my other pants), but I had no issues with being on time throughout my day. The watch is driven by what Corum calls the CO395 movement, which starts off with a base ETA 2895, and puts some additional decoration and a custom rotor into the mix. Given the solid ETA base, one would presume that reliability, accuracy, and maintainability shouldn’t be a problem.
Fittingly, for a watch as water-themed as the Corum Admiral Legend 42 (and yet still managing to not be a dive watch), it comes on a rubber strap with folding clasp. With the rubber, you get a strap that’s snugging right into those angles on the case, which makes for a tight look. It also means, if you like swapping out watch straps, you’re going to be stuck with just the stock option, or possibly getting a NATO to work. Anything else, and that case gap will ruin you.
On the flip side of that water-based coin, it’s surprising that the Corum Admiral Legend 42 only carries a 50m water resistance rating. Now, I’m not expecting some depth-crushing 500m rating, or something like that. I would just hope that a watch, that would seem to be most at home on the deck of a boat, would carry at least a 100m rating, so as to better keep things safe should you take a dive into the blue.
Then again, perhaps the Corum Admiral Legend 42 is aimed more at those who captain a desk, like myself, and want to be reminded more of the water’s call. In that case, yeah, the watch works great. In an office environment (or, say, out to a nice dinner) the mostly-white dial paired with the high polish of the case makes for a nice, dressy piece. Find yourself in a funkier setting? Well, the random (to the untrained eye) patterns at the indices liven things up. And yeah, even though I griped about the water resistance rating, it certainly is enough to cover you in your day to day (just don’t get crazy in the water with it).
As I mentioned in the outset, the Corum Admiral Legend 42 was my first experience with the brand, and I’m glad I went in a different direction than what might be more commonly expected. Sure, the boating theme is not something I would particularly seek out myself, but I appreciated the ICS flags being used, and found them to be visually intriguing as well. Should you want to bring your own Corum Admiral Legend 42

Corum Admiral 45 Tourbillon Openworked

Swiss watch brand Corum has long been known for its Admiral collection of watches, inspired by the great sailing races and the sea. Over the decades, the collection has enjoyed a host of iterations, but this year, at Watches & Wonders 2021, the brand reinterprets the classic, modern icon into a modern, high-tech masterpiece. Today, to celebrate its mastery of the maritime watch, Corum unveils the Corum Admiral 45 Automatic Openworked Flying Tourbillon Carbon & Gold watch.

The Admiral is known for its dodecagonal-shaped bezel and nautical pennants on the dial. The newest Corum Admiral 45 Automatic Openworked Flying Tourbillon Carbon & Gold watch still boasts those legendary signatures, but in a new way. The pennant are in black while the case is crafted in black carbon with gold flecks for a truly high-tech look. It marks the first time that Corum uses light-wight carbon and to signify the importance of the watch, the brand mixes the carbon with 18-karat gold glitter to achieve this eye-catching look.
Crafted using layer after layer of the material, every case is unique. Just 48 pieces will be made of the dynamic 45mm watch. For Corum, whose watchmaking standards are incredibly stringent, it isn’t enough to offer a unique case and innovative material, though. The brand also super charges the watch with an open-worked movement with flying tourbillon escapement in colors that mime the black carbon and gold case.

The automatic flying tourbillon movement, CO 298, was developed in house by the brand. It beats at 3Hz to offer incredible precision, and the tourbillon escapement compensates for errors in timekeeping due to the effects of gravity on the watch when it is in a horizontal position. Equipping the piece with a flying tourbillon is also a nod to the sailing world, where safe navigation of the seas requires ultimate precision. In addition to the hour, minute and flying tourbillon, the watch displays the power reserve indicator and offers 72 hours of reserve.
The Corum Admiral 45 Automatic Openworked movement is visible on both the dial side and case back side to showcase the meticulously finished components, the magnificent bridges and the mesmerizing constantly rotating flying tourbillon escapement. The watch also boasts a strap made of rubber and synthetic textiles with genuine gold stitching. The high-tech, high-mech watch is water resistant to 100 meters.

A tour of the dial showcase a gold-toned brass flanged for the minutes indication, against which the black pennants sit. The three counters are crafted using both silvers and gold-toned materials. The crown is actually 5N 18-karat rose gold. Both sapphire crystals are treated with an anti-reflective coating. The new carbon and gold Admiral 45 Open Worked Flying Tourbillon retails for $59,800.

The new standout timepiece is complemented by new Admiral 38mm and 42mm Automatics, but that is another story coming soon.

Corum Admiral 45 Chronograph

Corum debuted the Admiral’s Cup AC-One 45 Chronograph back in 2013 as a new line within its iconic Admiral’s Cup collection. Less “quirky” and more contemporary in design, the AC-One 45 has since seen some more elaborate models, all of which seem to shout out, “This isn’t your Grandfather’s Corum watch.” Now in 2019, the brand is releasing its latest iteration with a slightly different name. The new Corum Admiral AC-One 45 Chronograph collection is an impressively refreshed luxury sports watch line that doesn’t abandon its identity or DNA, while recognizing that people’s tastes have evolved, and moves along with the times.
The Corum Admiral 45 Chronograph watch has been around since 1960, when it was released as the first square-shaped water-resistant watch. The Admiral’s Cup remained a square watch until the early 1980s, when Corum made the first major change to the design of the Admiral’s Cup by creating the now easily recognizable dodecagonal case shape. The watch would go on to even outlive the eponymous Admiral’s Cup yachting regatta, which ended in 2003. The Corum Admiral’s Cup watches produced from about 1983 all the way to 2006 would share this case shape. In 2006, Corum modernized the watch with a bigger case and more of an overall “sports watch” style, with the first AC-One 45 Chronograph arriving seven years after that.
The dodecagonal twelve-sided “Admiral case” still defines the watch, which is now leaning even harder into the crowded, competitive, and diverse segment that can best be described as boldly designed luxury sports watches that prefer a strap to a bracelet and can boast high water resistance. It’s obvious to anyone that pieces like the Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Offshore and Hublot Big Bang absolutely dominate the segment. However, with the AC-One 45 Chronograph being about a third the cost of the chronograph versions of these two, the competitive landscape is friendlier territory for Corum. The brand is pricing these 300-meter water-resistant luxury chronographs right at the sweet spot: $9,900 in titanium and $18,000 in gold.
There are four models of the new Corum Admiral AC-One 45 Chronograph, two in titanium and two in gold. The dial options are the same no matter which metal you choose, either a panda dial or a reverse panda dial. The changes and updates made to the dial don’t comprehensively change the identity of the AC-One 45 Chronograph, but they are potent and give me more faith in the brand’s future than I’ve had since I became a watch enthusiast.
The outgoing version had a large ’60’ index at 12 o’clock, which is now gone. It’s replaced with an applied Corum key that is proportional in size to the rest of the hour-marker indices around the dial. I have always found the Corum key to be alluring and memorable, so I’m glad it’s now getting prominent placement on the dial without competing with needless distractions that dwarf it in comparison. Unchanged is the chronograph hand design which also uses the Corum key as the counterweight. It’s a matter of taste but I think it looks simply glorious. The dials are all decorated in Corum’s “grenadier fendu” (“split pomegranate”) pattern. It’s a simple but attractive repeating pattern of raised diagonally cut squares that add a level of high-finish, as well as dimensionality, to the dial.
Now, it wouldn’t be a true successor to the Admiral’s Cup watches without the hourly nautical pennants that are as closely associated with the watch as the case shape. Where the sloping flange (or inner bezel ring) creates a 150° angle is where you’ll find the corresponding number flag from the International Code of Signals. I can’t be exactly sure, but the numeral flags are, in part, characterized by corresponding colors. Here, the flags are thankfully done only in white or black. So, while the flag for 1 and the flag for 2 appear identical, the aesthetic decision was absolutely the right one since all the colors lining the dial would have absolutely ruined it.

While these nautical pennants don’t dominate the dial anymore, Corum honors the regatta-centric design DNA of the Admiral’s Cup in a tasteful way.
The chronograph sub-dials are bunched up close together, but the guilloché work and framing of each sub-dial adds refinement and more visual texture that complements the overall design, rather than clashing. The date window between 4 and 5 o’clock is similarly framed and, fortunately, matches the respective sub-dial color. The openworked and faceted hour and minute hands aren’t as legible as they could be, though I understand and agree with them as a pure aesthetic decision. Fortunately, the ends of the hands have lume, as do the hour markers.

One more thing about the dial: The old version had “Admiral’s Cup” written right across the dial. Now, the hours sub-dial at 6 o’clock simply reads “Admiral” across the the bottom. Fortunately, all of this is legible and easily read due to the healthy application of anti-reflective coating on the sapphire crystal on the dial as well as the exhibition caseback.
The case is water resistant to 300 meters (no shock here, considering the collection’s history) and measures 45mm-wide, 14.3mm-thick, and has a 51mm lug-to-lug measurement. The Royal Oak Offshore Chronograph 44mm has a 55mm lug-to-lug, and the Big Bang Chronograph 44mm has a 56mm lug-to-lug measurement. These lug-to-lug measurements make them wear considerably larger than their case width would suggest. In fact, the 41mm-wide Big Bang Chronograph has a 51mm lug-to-lug measurement, making it basically identical in size to this 45mm-wide Corum.

So, someone who finds a 45mm-wide case as typically being too big should keep the much more wearable lug-to-lug measurement in mind. The substantial size of the crown guard and chronograph pushers also explains the 45mm case width of the Corum Admiral AC-One 45 Chronograph. The cases are done in either titanium or 18k rose gold with a piece of titanium between the bezel and case. This extends around the double-knurled crown and is characterized by the two screws above and beneath the crown. This piece of titanium is done in black PVD for all but the reverse panda model in titanium which has a very cool white finish to it. Coincidentally, this model happens to be my favorite of the bunch, by far. Finally, the slightly angled chronograph pushers feel as good as they look, which is to say fantastic. The titanium piece creates some separation between the bezel and the rest of the case. The part of the case between the lugs is angled, converging in the middle and creating a visual language that is carried on in the rubber strap. The integrated strap has been clearly thought out as a crucial part of the watch and the subtly engraved Corum key on both the top and the bottom is a great touch. Finally, Corum switched out the old buckle for a new triple-folding clasp. Turning the Corum Admiral AC-One 45 Chronograph around reveals an exhibition caseback and the automatic Corum CO 132 movement, which, I believe, is a modified ETA movement. The black PVD-coated rotor takes up much of the caseback, though the Corum logo in the gold versions looks very nicely done, as do the decorative screws. The CO 132 operates at 28,800 vph and has a 42-hour power reserve.
The newly updated Corum Admiral AC-One 45 Chronograph is a testament to how thoughtful design and a willingness to iterate can result in an exponentially better product. This watch is one of the most pleasant and unexpected surprises for me this year. It looks, feels, and wears great; however, there’s certainly room to improve with the movement. These watches should make their way over to the Corum e-shop soon this year.

Corum Admiral 45 Tourbillon

Corum launched the Corum Admiral’s Cup collection in 1960 and the watches were easily identified by their distinctive design: twelve-sided case architecture and nautical flags in place of numerals have been the characteristic markers of this line throughout its history.

In particular, the singular nautical pennants have always formed an unmistakable signature element in this collection – a flagship, so to speak. Rooted in Corum founder René Bannwart’s fondness for sailing and regattas, its original name derived from an annual series of yacht races off the southern coast of England until 2003.

In recent years, the Admiral’s Cup collection has gone through some minor design changes that nonetheless retain the design codes that originally set it apart. Now generally smaller, lighter looking, and somewhat softer in its angular duodenary shape, the Admiral’s Cup has also slightly changed names to become the Admiral collection.
Corum Admiral 2021 standout: 45 Automatic Openworked Flying Tourbillon Carbon & Gold
In 2021, Corum releases several new Admiral timepieces, ranging from smaller, pastel-toned stainless steel or gold models through striking two-tone editions with chocolate brown dials and even some classic homage variations, all with the much-loved original colorful pennants marking the hours on the dial.

But the pinnacle of these new additions is the Corum Admiral 45 Automatic Openworked Flying Tourbillon Carbon & Gold.
Let’s start with the design – and specifically the case as the dynamic high-tech material used here represents an all-new case material for Corum.

Crafted in layers of ultra-light carbon mixed with resin and 30 percent 18-karat 5N red gold flakes, each and every case of this 48-piece edition is unique: as it is heated and compressed before shot into a mold, the gold flakes distribute across the carbon/resin mixture in different ways before settling into place. The result is a rather blithe material 2.5 times lighter than titanium and 4.5 times lighter than 316L stainless steel.

The look is unique – but within that, each case is also unique.
The specific black and gold styling of the case sets the tone for the whole watch and is continued in every other component, including the crown protection made of the same material, with an added ring of composite black resin and the polished red gold, grooved, screw-down crown adorned with an engraved Corum key logo.

The dial also carefully adheres to this color scheme, with only the displays, visible gears, and tourbillon left in their natural steely colors, setting them apart and putting the focus on their functionality and importance.
The red gold-plated bronze track flange around the perimeter of the dial, also lightly 12-sided to follow the shape of the carbon-and-gold bezel, is home to both the hashmarks for minutes and the hour markers, which are heavily stylized pennants in a black gold galvanic treatment.

The Admiral’s Cup pennants – such a classic design component for this collection – disappeared off the dials for a while (but are back now for the most part), and here the shape is highly reminiscent of that period. In this form the pennant hour markers do not take away from the real stars of the show: the gold-flecked black case and the one-minute flying tourbillon at 6 o’clock.

Held in place by technical-looking brass bridges in keeping with the overall flow, functions added to the hour and minute include a power reserve indicator at 9 o’clock and a three-minute counter at 3 o’clock. These two displays are counterbalanced by the visible flying tourbillon at 6 o’clock and the visible mainspring barrel offering 72 hours’ worth of power at 12 o’clock.

Unobtrusive hands coated with black Super-LumiNova proudly point to the time, which seems a little secondary on this imposing timepiece.
The Admiral Openworked Flying Tourbillon Carbon & Gold is completed with an equally creative strap made of rubber and synthetic textiles stitched together with genuine gold thread.

Now Corum Admiral 45 Automatic Openworked Flying Tourbillon Carbon & Gold: movement
Aside from the mechanical beauty of the flying tourbillon, Caliber CO 298 boasts another special functional element: the three-minute counter. Inspired by the symbolism of the three founders of Corum (René Bannwart, Gaston Ries, and Simone Ries), the playful idea of the three-minute counter was born and takes its position on the dial where the small seconds would usually be.

Corum’s technicians had to recalculate the seconds gearing so that the counter shows 180 instead of 60. This wasn’t a huge development, though, as the brand supercharged the watch with a freshly developed movement.

Though the movement is openworked, not everything is visible from the front, just the mesmerizing flying tourbillon escapement at 6 o’clock, the spring barrel at 12 o’clock, and the gear train and underdial gearing, which is mainly visible on top of the black plate in the center of the watch.

Not skeletonizing the entirety of the movement (and showing it all) is a great compromise as the watch highlights the desired technical elements but doesn’t make an already busy watch too busy.
The openworked, black PVD-coated movement is also visible on the back where some components can be seen through the full-sized galvanically treated brass rotor that covers the entirety of the opening. Its shape is a nod to an historic sailing ship’s wheel, which ties back into the classic Admiral’s Cup collection thematic.

This watch has been created in a limited edition of just 48 pieces – and this number also holds some symbolism, though not from Corum’s history this time, but rather from Chinese numerology.
As Corum’s marketing and communication manager Marc Wälti explained to me, “The number 4 is about our passion and dynamism, while the number 8 resonates with the manifestation of wealth and abundance, learning by experience, inner strength and wisdom, autonomy, and reliability. Both together are the reward of hard work done well.”
There were a LOT of watches that were announced a few weeks back at the virtual show Watches & Wonders. We’ve covered a few so far, but one of the ones that really caught my eye was the Corum Admiral 45 Openworked Tourbillon.
With Corum, the Admiral lineup has been there for some time, and even having a flying tourbillon right there on the dial, that’s something we’ve seen before. So, how does Corum mix it up? You take ultra-light (and ultra-strong) carbon fiber, and mix it up in layers complete with gold flake. Forged carbon has always looked cool to me (though not sure that this is forged), but mixing in the gold flake really just makes it all the more interesting in my book.

Corum Admiral 45 Skeleton

Since 1960, the Corum Admiral 45 Skeleton collection has sailed over fashions and trends. This pillar of the Corum brand stands out with its seafaring spirit. The new versions introduced at Baselworld 2018 continue to maintain this unique identity. So on the Corum Admiral 45 Skeleton , you can see the famous twelve-section bezel with its twelve engraved pennants. For these new versions, as its name implies, the dial has given way to a spectacular openwork staging. The mechanical movement is of course visible, but attention particularly centres on the figures that seem to be floating. They show the date, displayed in a counter with a solid background at 6 o’clock. This “airborne” design is boosted by the range of bright colours – turquoise, yellow or red. The colours are echoed on elements of the watch case and on the central second hand. The overall result is dynamic and refreshing, and highlighted by a 45mm-wide titanium case that is water-resistant down to 300m.
Two wide dauphine-style hands move above the mechanism. They are driven by the calibre C0 082, a self-winding movement providing 42 hours of power reserve once the watch is fully wound.

To reinforce the sports-chic style, the Corum Admiral 45 Skeleton comes with a vulcanised rubber strap in a colour matching the date counter. In the near future, Corum is planning to make bespoke models. In the meantime, seven models, each available in 288 pieces, are on offer, with three made of natural titanium and four of matt-black PVD titanium.
As customers want more transparency with the items they pay thousands of dollars for, Corum’s Admiral 45 Skeleton watch has this and more. The beautiful dials of the famous model have been taken out and all the screws, bolts, and the innovative functions of the timepiece are revealed to the clients. Despite such,
The Corum Admiral 45 Squelette has a date window at 6 o’clock and a solid chassis so that you may read the info on the open date display. The color of the frame stands out in color with the date, leading to the modern and sporty feel of the watch.
Corum Admiral’s Cup model family, one of the first names that come to mind among maritime-themed models, is the guest of our Hands-On corner with the AC 45 Squelette, which attracts attention with its bold color scheme.. Among the boutique names of luxury watchmaking, Corum hosts many models that redefine the concept of being unique.
The new Admiral’s Cup AC-One 45 Squelette is no exception. At the heart of its grade 5 titanium case beats a high-precision (28,800 vph) mechanism: automatic Caliber CO 9000 . For the first time, this movement with its 42-hour power reserve appears in an entirely openworked architecture that draws all eyes to explore the heart of its intricate gear trains with their resolutely contemporary finish.

Corum Golden Bridge full diamond

History is perhaps better told by those who have lived it, and claims are better made by those who have seen or experienced them. Since I am still a spring chicken and have not personally experienced the history behind today’s piece, I will refrain from quoting others about the origins of one of my favorite creations: the Corum Golden Bridge.

Instead, I will begin with a touch of my own history why I find a kinship with the piece, why I think it was created, and why I think it that the watch gained such popularity.

Before I realized that I loved Corum Golden Bridge I was sure that I loved mechanical things, and stood in awe of the many mechanisms and contraptions that I saw over my young life. These included robotics, engines, and industrial equipment, all the way down to neat little hinges or clever tools that I saw my father use in the garage.

Basically, I was curious about how things worked. I’m aware I have said much of this before, but it deserves repeating since it is still, to this day, a driving force for almost every passion I have.

Once I became aware of watches and the amazing marvels that they held within, I had the feeling that some things looked familiar. I could never be sure, and nobody else I knew was even partially knowledgeable about the subject or my exposure to mechanics as a child, but I felt that I had seen some of the watches I began learning about before.

And one of those just happened to be one of my favorites as well, the Corum Golden Bridge.
To me, the Corum Golden Bridge stood out as an example of perfect horological exhibitionism. There have been many skeleton watches over the years, and more recently there has been a renaissance of exposed movements and featured mechanics. I personally feel that this helps remind people that mechanical watches are pretty darn incredible and, to the uninitiated at least, seemingly impossible creations.

Of all the watches that extol the virtues of the mechanical movement, no other piece does it as simply, cleanly, or straightforward in manner as the Golden Bridge.

In a skeletonized watch, the wearer can attempt to follow the path of the power from the mainspring to the hairspring, and if they are lucky, they might be able to deduce how it works.
But with the linear arrangement invented by Vincent Calabrese, it is almost impossible to not understand how it works. If I think back to my earliest adventures with watches, this movement helped me to first understand the mechanics, long before I became a full-blown WIS (Watch Idiot Savant, in other words, watch geek).

Vincent Calabrese’s stroke of genius
Here I would also like to pose my own theory that the Golden Bridge is at least partially responsible for a continued passion for mechanical watches after the early days of the quartz crisis.

Invented in 1977 by Calabrese and first publicly available from Corum in 1980, the Golden Bridge couldn’t have come at a better time. It showed the watch aficionado and technophile alike that there is beauty in the mechanics, and that they are worth a closer look instead of being abandoned for the latest electronic technologies.

Now, after more than 30 years of Golden Bridge production, it has received some very nice upgrades. TheCorum Golden Bridge Automatic Titanium is the latest and (arguably) greatest example of the model. I will admit that the Golden Bridge Dragon is astounding as well, but I still prefer the mechanics in the Automatic Titanium model.
Let’s start with a feature I didn’t notice until it was pointed out, which is now one of my favorite elements even though it happens to be a static component: the case back.

Wait, wait, let me explain. Normally I don’t go gaga over the case back unless it is . . . well, I’ve never actually gone gaga over a case back. But this one utilizes materials and optics to its advantage, and I can truly appreciate that.

The case back is mainly, of course, a transparent sapphire crystal. Added to the inside of the crystal are very small red gold, metalized stripes running parallel to the bridge movement.
These lines create texture and when viewing the movement from the rear and make for a nice pattern overlaying the linear weight and movement. Also, since the point of the Golden Bridge timepiece is to make the movement appear to float in the case, it does not impede your view by covering anything up.

Put the Corum Golden Bridge on the wrist and the story changes. Based on the proximity of the lines to each other, and the fact that light is now only coming from the front of the movement, the rear case back appears almost opaque, and the hairy wrist underneath disappears (well my hairy wrist did anyway).

As far as I can tell, this is due to the light not being able to bounce cleanly through the sapphire, onto the wrist (and due to refraction on the rear side of the sapphire crystal) and back out again before being mainly scattered or absorbed by the metalized lines.

Techniques like this have been in use for electronics, privacy, and optical control recently, though I still have not had much hands-on experience with something so simple and complicated at the same time.
Now we move on to the bag-o-fun that is the linear oscillating weight powering the automatic winding. It is just cool. Basically, the design and construction of the Golden Bridge movement has been begging for this feature ever since its inception. And almost no other movement is as well-suited for it like Caliber CO313.

The feature comprises a four-gram platinum mass attached to a carriage that slides along Teflon-coated steel rails. The carriage incorporates beryllium copper sleeves for further reduced friction, while the rails are topped with rubber O-rings that provide a cushion for the weight at each end of its one-centimeter journey.
But most importantly, included in the carriage design is a gear rack on one side to translate the linear motion into rotational motion and wind the watch. To prevent over-winding and reduce complexity, winding only occurs in one direction and the rack “slips” in the other direction. Similar to many rotor designs, really, just made to match the straight lines of the Golden Bridge.

Oh yes, the Golden Bridge, the reason we are all here. What can I really say about a movement that is 37 years old and still holds the same appeal as the day it was debuted? Its simplicity is its main virtue; the linear layout of the gear train seems like it would be the perfect training tool, and I have heard it actually is used as such since it makes the most sense visually.
I may never personally own a Golden Bridge, and this new one in titanium is definitely the most wearable one for a guy who is a little rough on his watches, but I can say this: the Golden Bridge is, in my humble opinion, one of the most seductive horological movements in a watch today.

Many movements feature incredibly complicated functions and astounding engineering. But sometimes the thing that you really want is a strictly clean and straightforward example of a top-notch movement.
I compare the Corum Golden Bridge to a Porsche: an iconic design that was pretty much perfect from the beginning, clean and simple without being overly flamboyant like a Lamborghini or Bugatti. The latter are two amazing cars, and I would take either of them any day. But on the days when I just want to drive and enjoy the simple pleasure of driving, I would hop in the Porsche and on my wrist would be the Golden Bridge.

Corum Golden Bridge replica

At first glance, the Corum Golden Bridge Titane DLC can be a little difficult to wrap your mind around. This is the evolution of Corum’s Golden Bridge with its “linear” movement that first finally came in a more traditional round case that we saw hands-on here. With its suspension bridge-like “struts” flanking the movement on either side, this new version has a rich black DLC finish applied to the titanium case. Meant to reference the Golden Gate Bridge or Brooklyn Bridge, you can easily see the correlation in the design.
Corum has unveiled two versions on this occasion, one in white gold (B113/03832) and the other in pink gold (B113/03831). You can see this difference primarily on the movement itself where the bridges and screws are fashioned in each metal, along with the hands and rehaut. The linear, or as Corum calls it “baguette,” movement is what helps set these watches apart from their peers. The hand-wound Corum CO 113 movement, operating at 4Hz with a power reserve of 40 hours, is arranged in a straight line running from noon to 6 o’clock. The 43mm-wide case (30m water-resistant) is sandwiched between two sapphire crystals offering you an extensive view of the entirety of the movement.
These new variations on Corum’s circular case seem apropos with the progression of the brand’s design concept. The movement itself and its unconventional construction are emphasized and displayed here. The contrast between the polished DLC on the case and struts of the watch cause the precious metals on the movement itself to pop, accentuating that “bridge” that makes up the overall movement’s aesthetic.
The construction of the watches we wear is something we perhaps don’t consider enough. We may discuss different elements of a watch between the case, dial, etc., but the Corum Golden Bridge emphasizes the structure of the piece both physically and conceptually – the linear movement suspended at either end of the case and the gear train ticking away between two sets of DLC-coated struts really bring this into sharp focus. I find these visual elements to be very compelling.
The Corum Golden Bridge Titane DLC watches will be offered on a rubber strap with a tire tread-like texture across it, outlining the brand name engraved into the center stripe. This seems like an interesting choice, perhaps appropriate for the sportier look that DLC will convey compared to a precious metal case. On one hand, I think a nice dark leather strap may have fit better, but I can see what Corum is trying to say by using the rubber.
Corum also states that these two watches will soon be accompanied by two additional models “available in the same shades of gold.” It is not clear if the DLC elements will be carried over to those new models. Ultimately, I think the success of these watches will be determined by Corum’s fanbase and collectors focused on fine watchmaking and movement innovation. The Corum Golden Bridge Titane DLC

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