rolex daytona 40 watch 116515LN

Before the highly-sought-after steel and ceramic Rolex Daytona, there was another Daytona with a black Cerachrom bezel: the ref. 116515LN. This Everose beauty is a fantastic version of the famous Rolex chronograph so let’s check it out.
The Rolex Daytona 116515LN made its debut at Baselworld 2011 and has been a popular model among the more expensive Daytona options. And that’s no surprise. Its 40mm Oyster case in 18k rose gold pairs impeccably well with the black ceramic bezel. A quick note on the gold and ceramic materials; these are not standard “off-the-shelf” varieties, but rather, Rolex-enhanced ones. The metal is the Rolex-exclusive rose gold alloy—aka Everose—which the brand claims will not fade over time. On the other hand, the Cerachrom ceramic bezel is yet another Rolex patent where the material is not only resistant to scratching but will also not fade even after decades of exposure to the sun.
As with all versions of the Rolex Daytona, the ref. 116515LN includes an engraved tachymeter on the bezel—an integral component to the chronograph function. This scale, in conjunction with the chronograph, permits the wearer to measure 400 units (whether kilometers or miles) per hour. This is what ultimately makes the Daytona Cosmograph a racecar driver’s watch. The center chronograph hand is accurate to within 1/8 of a second. Along with the main chrono hand, there’s also the 30-minute counter subdial at 3 o’clock and the 12-hour counter subdial at 9 o’clock. Those two registers are also joined by a small seconds indicator at 6 o’clock. The layout of the three registers (in addition to the pushers at 2 and 4 o’clock) is a big part of what gives the Daytona its famous look.
Vintage Rolex Daytona watches first ran on manual-wound Valjoux movements, which were eventually replaced by automatic movements based on Zenith El Primo calibers. Today, however, all Rolex Daytona watches have the in-house automatic movement, the Rolex Caliber 4130. Released in 2000, the Caliber 4130’s first home was in the then-new Daytona ref. 116520. This Rolex manufacture chronograph movement took five years to develop and boasts the more efficient vertical clutch construction rather than the more traditional lateral one. Essentially, the vertical clutch approach eliminates the “jumpiness” of the chronograph hand and offers one with smooth motion instead. What’s more, it also reduces the chronograph function’s negative effect on the watch’s accuracy. Also, the proprietary Rolex chronograph caliber requires fewer components than a standard chronograph movement, thus improving reliability. As we’ve come to expect, when Rolex takes on a challenge, they eventually present a better alternative that what’s already available.
While this particular Everose Rolex Daytona ref. 116515 is presented on an elegant black leather strap, this option is currently not available on the Rolex website. Instead, the brand has the Daytona ref. 116515LN on an Oysterflex bracelet instead. The Daytona with the Oysterflex is, in fact, brand new—Baselworld 2017 new! Does this mean that Rolex will no longer produce the ref. 116515LN on leather? If so, better get your hands on this one quick before it becomes too difficult to find. We’ll be taking a close look at the new Rolex Daytona Oysterflex in an upcoming article, so stay tuned for that.

What are your thoughts on the Everose Daytona with the black Cerachrom bezel? Do you prefer it on a leather strap, metal bracelet, or the new Oysterflex?

Rolex Daytona 40 Watch 116598TBR

Named the Rolex Daytona 40 Watch 116598TBR as a tribute to the auto racing enthusiasts who travel to Daytona Beach, the iconic Rolex timepiece is one of the house’s most beloved watches. It merges style with function, with the versatility to go from the board room to the race track and everywhere in between.
Rolex Oyster Perpetual Cosmograph Daytona Automatic Watch White Gold and Alligator with Sodalite Dial and Diamond Markers 40

Introduced in 1963, the Rolex Daytona 40 Watch 116598TBR is the pinnacle of quality and one of Rolex’s most beloved sports watches. This special Rolex Daytona review showcases the enduring design of fashion and functionality that goes from the race track to the boardroom and everywhere in between. It is the ultimate timing tool for endurance racing drivers and luxury watch collectors.

Popularity That Spans from the Racetrack to the Red Carpet
First known as “Le Mans” after the race held in Le Mans, France, it is a perfect racing watch with a tachometer bezel. It allows drivers to measure elapsed time and calculate average speed. Rolex rebranded the watch “Daytona” as a nod to Daytona Beach in Florida, a mecca for auto racing enthusiasts.

Famous fans like Paul Newman propelled the watch’s popularity. The actor was also a race car driver, sporting his favorite watch in many Daytona Beach events. There’s even a version of the style named after him and easily recognizable by its contrasting colored scale around the dial. Highly sought after and valuable, it is the highest-priced timepiece sold at auction for 17.8 million.
More popular with men and loved by women Rolex Daytona 40 Watch 116598TBR customers, it’s a perfect unisex watch. The Daytona is popular among celebrities, including Paul Newman, Victoria Beckham, Jay-Z, Michael Jordan, John Legend, Ellen DeGeneres, and many more. Some of the most sought after styles include:

Rolex Daytona 116505

The ref. 116505 was the first Everose gold Rolex Daytona. Like other modern Daytona watches, the Everose gold Daytona ref. 116505 sports a 40mm case fitted with screw-down chronograph pushers and a screw-down winding crown.
On top of the 18k Everose gold case of the Rolex Daytona 116505 is a matching Everose gold bezel, engraved with the handy tachymeter scale. There are a few dial colors to choose from including black, ivory, rose gold, and chocolate brown; some even boast baguette diamond hour markers.
But there is also the collectibility of vintage Rolex Daytona 116505 watches. Anyone just getting interested in vintage watches nowadays soon finds out that, unless you have extremely deep pockets, collecting vintage Cosmograph Daytonas is out of the question at this point.
In 2011, Rolex paired Everose and Cerachrom on its flagship chronograph watch to give us the Daytona ref. 116515. The Everose Daytona ref. 116515 has a black Cerachrom bezel, and comes fitted on a black leather strap or Oysterflex bracelet.
The 116505 is accurate up to +/-2 seconds per day, holds a power reserve of 72 hours, has a bi-directional rotor, and comes fitted with at Paramagnetic blue Parachrom hairspring to reduce magnetic interference. Overall the Rolex Daytona 116505 is a very attractive luxury chronograph for any horological enthusiast.
The reference 116505 case is created from a block of 18K Everose gold. The triple waterproof crown and patented case closure hermetically seals the works from water up to a depth of 100 meters or 330 feet, making this one of the hardest-working watches in the Rolex collection. Only the Submariner has better depth rating, and, like all Daytonas,

rolex day-date 228398tbr

The Day-Date ref. 180XX series launched in 1978 and stands as something of a transitional reference for the model.

Things were moving fairly swiftly for Rolex at the time, as evidenced by the fact that the range was only around until 1988, before the rolex day-date 228398tbr family took over.

However, as with many Rolex models, any upgrades taking place were usually confined to the internals. The Day-Date’s aesthetics had been nailed down through previous references, and the incoming five-digit watches shared a virtually identical look to the retiring four-digit ref. 18XX examples which had been in production for more than 20-years.

As the brand’s longtime flagship, the watch nicknamed the President was issued with a wide-ranging options list. It was available in any of the three colors of gold (rose, white and yellow) as well as some extremely rare platinum versions. The only one missing, as always, was steel. The Day-Date has long been the most elitist creation Rolex has brought forward and as such, it was always forged from precious metal or nothing. Even the half-and-half steel and gold Rolesor is absent.

The rolex day-date 228398tbr f is a particularly special reference, and one fast becoming the new darling of collectors looking for the next big thing. With even the late run versions now more than 30-years old, they are just turning vintage and have started to emerge as neo-classics, albeit with a quirky twist.

Definitely an eccentric in among the usually conservative President models, below we take a closer look at this beautiful model.
Like every previous iteration of the watch, the ref. 18078 is 36mm in diameter. It is only in recent years that the piece has been made in versions measuring beyond those time-honored dimensions, firstly with the short-lived 41mm Day-Date II in 2008 and then the current Day-Date 40 from 2015.

These days, 36mm is actually seen as somewhat of a traditional size offering, as popular with women as men, with tastes in watch sizes gradually increasing as fashions change.

The reference numbers from around this era become more carefully regulated than earlier in Rolex’s history, and give us all the basic information we need about the model. So, 180 indicates a Day-Date with the then-new Cal. 3055 movement. The final numeral, 8, indicates that the watch is made from 18k yellow gold. But it is the 7, the number that denotes the bezel, which signifies this as one of the more unusual variants in the stable.

Very much of its time, and no longer an option in the range, the ref. 18078 has what is known as a bark finish on its surround. In visual terms, it is somewhat akin to the engine-turned pattern seen on vintage Datejust models, where a series of decorative grooves would be etched around the perimeter. That style, however, is intentionally uniform and ornate (and not especially different to the traditional fluted design) while the bark is kept deliberately rough.

It is a very different aspect for a watch seen as a pillar of the establishment, and adds an unconventional, playful element which has attracted many fans. As if that wasn’t enough, the look is continued down the central links of the President bracelet, which we will come to a little later.
By far the biggest change introduced into the rolex day-date 228398tbr f range over the former series was the movement in use.

The Cal. 3055 replaced the Cal. 1556, one of two calibers which had driven the ref. 18XX watches over their two decades of production (the other one being the Cal. 1555 up until 1967).

While the Cal. 3055 carried over many components from the Cal. 1556, it did introduce several key differences, modifications that elevated the Day-Date to new heights of accuracy and convenience.

Firstly, the balance frequency. The outgoing engine had beat at 19,800vph, itself an increase from the Cal. 1555’s 18,000vph. It was the Cal. 3055 which brought the now-standard 28,800vph speed to the President range, giving the familiar eight-ticks-per-second sweep to the seconds hand.

Furthermore, the Quickset feature made its debut, allowing the date numeral in its three o’clock window to be adjusted independently. Now, pulling out the crown to its second position gave free control over the setting process, without having to spin the main hands through 24-hours. However, the day of the week display in the 12 o’clock aperture still had to be changed the longwinded way, and so the Cal. 3055 is known as a Single Quickset. It wouldn’t be until the series was renewed again in 1988 to the ref. 182XX models, powered by the Cal. 3155, that the President received its first Double Quickset mechanism.

Beyond that, this upgraded caliber had much in common with the old one. Features such as the free-sprung Nivarox hairspring with Breguet overcoil, the Microstella-regulated Glucydur balance wheel and the hacking function (introduced in the Cal. 1556 in 1972) were all retained, those systems being so well-proven there was no need to start messing around with them.

It gained an extra jewel, going from 26 to 27, but the power reserve stayed at a reasonable 48-hours.

In all, even though it wasn’t one of the longest serving movements in the Rolex canon, it provided excellent service and the addition of the Quickset brought a welcome break from the tedium of setting at least one of the calendar complications.
Because the bark finish on the ref. 18078’s bezel and bracelet was such an unorthodox look, the watch had a more limited appeal overall and so Rolex produced it in far lower numbers than some of the more established examples.

As a result, we have a smaller range of dial colors to choose from than you might be used to when looking at other President models.

Most common is the champagne dial, the glowing hue complementing the case perfectly and providing the classic Day-Date aesthetic. Elsewhere you will find faces in black, white, blue and silver, each of which has a significant effect on breaking up all that gold and giving a more restrained visual.

But perhaps the most popular combination on the ref. 18078, considering its slightly far-out styling, are the wood burl dials. These were particular to the 70s and early 80s and featured on both the Day-Date and Datejust models. Thin slivers taken from knots of wood, usually from birch, mahogany or walnut trees, would be fused with the underlying brass plate from which Rolex forms their dials. As you would imagine, each one is utterly unique, something which has always attracted luxury watch collectors and President buyers especially.

A couple of other differences with the ref. 180XX series over the ref. 18XX was the shape of the faces themselves. The vintage pie-pan design of old was retired and the new dials came in completely flat as we see them in the contemporary range.

The number of languages used for the day of the week also grew considerably. The outgoing reference had only 11 while the initial run of the ref. 18078 had 24, rising to 25 around 1984.

And finally, a sapphire crystal was used to protect everything for the first time, replacing the former acrylic. That, and the introduction of a Twinlock crown, meant it was the first family to gain a water resistance of 100m.
The Day-Date ref. 180XX was issued exclusively on the three semicircular-link President bracelet, from where the watch itself takes its nickname.

It has always been the ideal accompaniment for the piece as a whole, superbly flexible and with a wonderful contrast between its polished center links and the brushed outers.

On the ref. 18078 though, it is a little different. Continuing the wood-like motif from the bezel, the central part of the band is also finished with a bark pattern, running its entire length. The whole bracelet is forged from 18k yellow gold, as is the iconic Crownclasp, an introduction from 1969 that offers a concealed fastening.

By this era in the President’s development, the end and side links were solid while the middle ones were folded, giving the bracelet a certain heft but it is lighter than the completely solid modern version. Beautifully well made and surprisingly sturdy, some of the first-run examples might have started to exhibit signs of stretch by now, but far less so than the true hollow-link style found on older vintage pieces.

The Rolex Day-Date ref. 18078 is an unusual model without doubt, very much characteristic of fashions in the 70s and 80s.

But, just as all trends seem to come full circle eventually, it is fast becoming a highly sought-after variant of an undeniably legendary watch.

The styling gives a great departure from the norm for those who want to stand out, but underneath it is still one of the most meticulously engineered timepieces you can buy, certain to last a lifetime and beyond.

Breitling Navitimer B01 Chronograph 43 Stainless Steel Cathay Pacific

Out of the entire 2022 Breitling Navitimer watch collection launched this week, there was one set of designs we were desperate to get our hands on. With polished pastel-toned dials, contrasting black subsidiary counters and perfectly sized 43mm cases, here is an in-depth look at the new Breitling Navitimer B01 Chronograph 43.

The Breitling Navitimer has come a long way since Willy Breitling first created the wrist-based flight tool for the AOPA (the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association). In 70 years, the design has secured a reputation for elegance, reliability and robustness, worn on the wrists of astronauts and on some of the world’s best-known celebrities. Now, in continuation of its journey as the brand’s flagship model, the Swiss watch manufacturer have relaunched the collection in a series of 41, 43, and 46mm chronographs with a new focus on colour, stylings and inclusive appeal.Cathay Pacific has partnered with Swiss luxury watchmaker Breitling to celebrate Cathay’s 76th anniversary, by co-curating the Breitling Navitimer chronograph with new design touches. Breitling’s Navitimer chronograph has been synonymous with travel and style since it first debuted in 1952. To celebrate the 70th anniversary of this iconic timepiece, Breitling is releasing a new collection of the Navitimer for 2022.

The collaboration has unveiled an exclusive design limited to just 200 individually numbered pieces: the Breitling Navitimer B01 Cathay Pacific limited edition. It also marks Cathay’s own 76th anniversary, and pays tribute to its rich aviation history and elevation into a premium travel lifestyle brand.

In the video ad, the Navitimer features an integrated slide rule which enabled essential flight calculations long before flight computers arrived on board. The 43mm collector’s model features the unique Navitimer design, updated for the modern age, whereas Cathay Pacific’s identity has been incorporated, with its signature Jade green on the watch face, and the words “Cathay Pacific Edition”, its individual number out of 200 engraved around the display caseback.
The Cathay Jade face contrasts with the white subdials and brown alligator leather strap – a warm, nostalgic look that renders this timepiece as suited to everyday wear as it is for the skies.New design touches for the 2022 Navitimer include a domed sapphire crystal, evolved slide rule, contrasting polished and brushed finishings, and a redesigned display caseback which reveals the workings of the in-house, COSC-certified Caliber 01 chronograph movement. One particular detail of note for aviation fans is the return of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association logo which graced the original 1952 chronograph.

Previously in March this year, Cathay Pacific partnered with Hong Kong label Native Union to launch a collection of tech accessories. According to Cathay, the limited edition accessories are inspired by Hong Kong and the way its people live. The collection includes a universal belt cable, wireless charger, AirPods Pro Case, and an organiser pouch. The lifestyle tech accessories collection will be retailed on the airline’s Asia Miles web shop.

This is not Cathay’s first venture with home-grown brands. Last year, Cathay and lifestyle brand Goods Of Desire launched a collaborative collection in celebration of their 75th and 25th anniversary respectively. The collection featured upcycled merchandise made from hundreds of Cathay cabin crew and cockpit uniforms.
The Breitling Navitimer B01 Chronograph 43 watches are available on a choice of two straps. The first option is a semi-shiny black alligator leather strap with white stitch detailing secured by either a folding clasp or tang buckle. The second is a seven-row linked bracelet with folding buckle. As you’d expect, the bracelets are engineered from their retrospective case material.

rolex day-date 228238

Originally introduced in 1956 as the new flagship watch in the Rolex lineup, the Day-Date is one of Rolex’s most iconic and instantly recognizable designs. Only ever manufactured in either 18-karat gold or 950 platinum, the Rolex Day-Date embodies prestige and exclusivity, and was the first watch to simultaneously display both the date and the day of the week (spelled out in full), through windows in the surface of the dial. Today we will discuss the differences between reference 6611 and the newer day-date: the reference 228238.

The Rolex Day-Date gets its “President” nickname from its simple yet distinctive bracelet, which is the single most defining characteristic of its iconic, overall appearance. United States President, Dwight D. Eisenhower frequently wore a gold Rolex watch while in office, which due to its all-gold appearance, was commonly mistaken for a Day-Date. In reality, Eisenhower wore an all-gold Datejust; however, the “President” name stuck with Rolex’s Day-Date line and has since become the official name for Rolex’s semi-circular, three-link bracelet, as well as a ubiquitously used nickname for the entire watch itself.
The reference 6611 Day-Date was introduced in 1957 and was actually the second iteration of the Day-Date that Rolex released. The very first Day-Date was the reference 6511; however just one year after it made its debut, Rolex replaced it with the reference 6611. Production of the reference 6611 lasted only a few years, and by 1959, it had been replaced by the third generation Day-Date watches with the 1800-series. Still, 36 mm in diameter and near identical to its predecessor, reference 6611 was based around Rolex’s caliber 1055 movement, which featured a free-sprung balance and was significantly more accurate and reliable than the movement in the reference 6511.

Although the caliber 1055 movement did not allow for hacking or hand winding, it was a significant upgrade for the Day-Date line of watches. Due to the exceptionally accurate results of the caliber 1055 movement during its initial chronometer-tests, the reference 6611 earned the “Superlative Chronometer Officially Certified” designation and was the first Rolex watch to ever have this now-iconic text printed on its dial. Additionally, to accompany the upgraded movement, the reference 6611 was the first Day-Date to ever be available with its now-iconic President bracelet.
Today the Rolex Day-Date is available in two different case sizes and with a number of different dial, metal, bezel, and bracelet combinations. Despite the growing number of options, the Day-Date is still exclusively craft from either 18k gold or platinum; no stainless steel or Rolesor (two-tone) options exist. The classic 36 mm Day-Date – a sweet spot for many wrists – is still manufactured; however, a larger version with a 40 mm case diameter was added to the Day-Date lineup in 2015 to cater to those who had been wanting a slightly larger version of the classic Rolex flagship watch.
Although the new, 40 mm Day-Date exists in a number of different reference numbers and configurations, the reference 228238, with its fluted bezel, President bracelet, and entirely yellow gold construction, bears the closest resemblance to the original Day-Date watch from the 1950s. However the new, 40 mm version of the Day-Date is based around Rolex’s state-of-the-art, caliber 3255 movement, which boasts all of their latest and greatest technologies, such as a blue Parachrom hairspring, a high-capacity barrel, an efficiently optimized gear train, and newly redesigned “Chronergy” escapement.

Throughout the years, a gold Rolex watch has served as an internationally recognized symbol of success and personal achievement, and no watch better embodies this title than the classic Rolex Day-Date on its signature President bracelet. Despite a number of updates and upgrades that took place over the course of several generations, the overall aesthetic of the Day-Date has remained remarkably consistent and largely unchanged for well over half a century. The classic, yellow gold Day-Date is one of the world’s most iconic and widely imitated designs, and it has grown to become a true cornerstone offering for the entire luxury watch industry.

rolex day-date 228398TBR

The Day-Date ref. 180XX series launched in 1978 and stands as something of a transitional reference for the model.

Things were moving fairly swiftly for Rolex at the time, as evidenced by the fact that the range was only around until 1988, before the ref. 182XX family took over.

However, as with many Rolex models, any upgrades taking place were usually confined to the internals. The Day-Date’s aesthetics had been nailed down through previous references, and the incoming five-digit watches shared a virtually identical look to the retiring four-digit ref. 18XX examples which had been in production for more than 20-years.

As the brand’s longtime flagship, the watch nicknamed the President was issued with a wide-ranging options list. It was available in any of the three colors of gold (rose, white and yellow) as well as some extremely rare platinum versions. The only one missing, as always, was steel. The Day-Date has long been the most elitist creation Rolex has brought forward and as such, it was always forged from precious metal or nothing. Even the half-and-half steel and gold Rolesor is absent.

The ref. 18078 is a particularly special reference, and one fast becoming the new darling of collectors looking for the next big thing. With even the late run versions now more than 30-years old, they are just turning vintage and have started to emerge as neo-classics, albeit with a quirky twist.

Definitely an eccentric in among the usually conservative President models, below we take a closer look at this beautiful model. rolex day-date 228398TBR

Rolex Day-Date ref. 18078 Metals and Bezels
Like every previous iteration of the watch, the ref. 18078 is 36mm in diameter. It is only in recent years that the piece has been made in versions measuring beyond those time-honored dimensions, firstly with the short-lived 41mm Day-Date II in 2008 and then the current Day-Date 40 from 2015.

These days, 36mm is actually seen as somewhat of a traditional size offering, as popular with women as men, with tastes in watch sizes gradually increasing as fashions change. rolex day-date 228398TBR

The reference numbers from around this era become more carefully regulated than earlier in Rolex’s history, and give us all the basic information we need about the model. So, 180 indicates a Day-Date with the then-new Cal. 3055 movement. The final numeral, 8, indicates that the watch is made from 18k yellow gold. But it is the 7, the number that denotes the bezel, which signifies this as one of the more unusual variants in the stable.

Very much of its time, and no longer an option in the range, the ref. 18078 has what is known as a bark finish on its surround. In visual terms, it is somewhat akin to the engine-turned pattern seen on vintage Datejust models, where a series of decorative grooves would be etched around the perimeter. That style, however, is intentionally uniform and ornate (and not especially different to the traditional fluted design) while the bark is kept deliberately rough.

It is a very different aspect for a watch seen as a pillar of the establishment, and adds an unconventional, playful element which has attracted many fans. As if that wasn’t enough, the look is continued down the central links of the President bracelet, which we will come to a little later.

Rolex Day-Date ref. 18078 Movements rolex day-date 228398TBR
By far the biggest change introduced into the ref. 180XX range over the former series was the movement in use.

The Cal. 3055 replaced the Cal. 1556, one of two calibers which had driven the ref. 18XX watches over their two decades of production (the other one being the Cal. 1555 up until 1967).

While the Cal. 3055 carried over many components from the Cal. 1556, it did introduce several key differences, modifications that elevated the Day-Date to new heights of accuracy and convenience.

Firstly, the balance frequency. The outgoing engine had beat at 19,800vph, itself an increase from the Cal. 1555’s 18,000vph. It was the Cal. 3055 which brought the now-standard 28,800vph speed to the President range, giving the familiar eight-ticks-per-second sweep to the seconds hand.

Furthermore, the Quickset feature made its debut, allowing the date numeral in its three o’clock window to be adjusted independently. Now, pulling out the crown to its second position gave free control over the setting process, without having to spin the main hands through 24-hours. However, the day of the week display in the 12 o’clock aperture still had to be changed the longwinded way, and so the Cal. 3055 is known as a Single Quickset. It wouldn’t be until the series was renewed again in 1988 to the ref. 182XX models, powered by the Cal. 3155, that the President received its first Double Quickset mechanism.

Beyond that, this upgraded caliber had much in common with the old one. Features such as the free-sprung Nivarox hairspring with Breguet overcoil, the Microstella-regulated Glucydur balance wheel and the hacking function (introduced in the Cal. 1556 in 1972) were all retained, those systems being so well-proven there was no need to start messing around with them.

It gained an extra jewel, going from 26 to 27, but the power reserve stayed at a reasonable 48-hours.

In all, even though it wasn’t one of the longest serving movements in the Rolex canon, it provided excellent service and the addition of the Quickset brought a welcome break from the tedium of setting at least one of the calendar complications.

Rolex Day-Date ref. 18078 Dials
Because the bark finish on the ref. 18078’s bezel and bracelet was such an unorthodox look, the watch had a more limited appeal overall and so Rolex produced it in far lower numbers than some of the more established examples.

As a result, we have a smaller range of dial colors to choose from than you might be used to when looking at other President models.

Most common is the champagne dial, the glowing hue complementing the case perfectly and providing the classic Day-Date aesthetic. Elsewhere you will find faces in black, white, blue and silver, each of which has a significant effect on breaking up all that gold and giving a more restrained visual.

But perhaps the most popular combination on the ref. 18078, considering its slightly far-out styling, are the wood burl dials. These were particular to the 70s and early 80s and featured on both the Day-Date and Datejust models. Thin slivers taken from knots of wood, usually from birch, mahogany or walnut trees, would be fused with the underlying brass plate from which Rolex forms their dials. As you would imagine, each one is utterly unique, something which has always attracted luxury watch collectors and President buyers especially.

A couple of other differences with the ref. 180XX series over the ref. 18XX was the shape of the faces themselves. The vintage pie-pan design of old was retired and the new dials came in completely flat as we see them in the contemporary range.

The number of languages used for the day of the week also grew considerably. The outgoing reference had only 11 while the initial run of the ref. 18078 had 24, rising to 25 around 1984.

And finally, a sapphire crystal was used to protect everything for the first time, replacing the former acrylic. That, and the introduction of a Twinlock crown, meant it was the first family to gain a water resistance of 100m.

Rolex Day-Date ref. 18078 Bracelets
The Day-Date ref. 180XX was issued exclusively on the three semicircular-link President bracelet, from where the watch itself takes its nickname.

It has always been the ideal accompaniment for the piece as a whole, superbly flexible and with a wonderful contrast between its polished center links and the brushed outers.

On the ref. 18078 though, it is a little different. Continuing the wood-like motif from the bezel, the central part of the band is also finished with a bark pattern, running its entire length. The whole bracelet is forged from 18k yellow gold, as is the iconic Crownclasp, an introduction from 1969 that offers a concealed fastening.

By this era in the President’s development, the end and side links were solid while the middle ones were folded, giving the bracelet a certain heft but it is lighter than the completely solid modern version. Beautifully well made and surprisingly sturdy, some of the first-run examples might have started to exhibit signs of stretch by now, but far less so than the true hollow-link style found on older vintage pieces.

The Rolex Day-Date ref. 18078 is an unusual model without doubt, very much characteristic of fashions in the 70s and 80s.

But, just as all trends seem to come full circle eventually, it is fast becoming a highly sought-after variant of an undeniably legendary watch.

The styling gives a great departure from the norm for those who want to stand out, but underneath it is still one of the most meticulously engineered timepieces you can buy, certain to last a lifetime and beyond.

rolex day-date 228349RBR

Introduced in 1956, the Rolex Day-Date was the world’s first wristwatch to feature windows on the dial to display both the date of the month and the day of the week written out in full. Since then, the Day-Date, better known as the President watch, has grown to become Rolex’s ultimate symbol of prestige – a watch that denotes success and affluence.

For over fifty years, the Rolex President was exclusively available with a 36mm case. While there have been 39mm versions of the Day-Date, these were fitted with Pearlmaster bracelets and called Masterpiece Day-Date watches. Therefore, they are not considered true Rolex Presidential watches. 36mm was the classic size for the Day-Date since the very beginning but for some, it was too small for a men’s watch – even for a dress timepiece.

Therefore, in 2008, the Swiss watchmaker unveiled a noticeably larger Rolex President model fitted with a 41mm case named the Rolex Day-Date II. Then, seven short years later, Rolex replaced the Day-Date II with the slightly smaller Rolex Day-Date 40 model. Given their similar dimensions and styles, there can be some confusion as to how these two larger Day-Date watches differ from each other. So, let’s explore the differences and similarities between the Day-Date II and the Day-Date 40 to determine which Rolex President is the right fit for you.
The Oyster case of the Rolex Day-Date II measures 41mm, while (as its name suggests) the Day-Date 40 measures 40mm. Although on the outset the 1mm difference seems trivial, wearing the watch is a different story. Due to its thicker lugs, chunkier build, and wider bezel, the Rolex Day-Date II wears larger and offers a bolder wrist presence than the 1mm variance suggests.

Conversely, not only did Rolex trim 1mm from the case size of the Day-Date 40, but its overall style is more elegant thanks to a thinner profile, thinner bezel, and slimmer lugs. It may be hard to tell with a quick glance but if you hold the two models side-by-side, the differences become quite apparent.

In short, the size variations and silhouette redesign mean that the Day-Date II is regarded as the slightly sportier choice, while the Rolex Day-Date 40 is more aligned with the classic 36mm Day-Date style but in a larger format.
One of the defining characteristics of all Rolex Day-Date watches, regardless of size or era, is their precious metal construction. Unlike its other models that offer steel or two-tone steel/gold variations, Rolex has only ever made the Day-Date in solid 18k gold or platinum. Nothing but the best for the Presidential watch and of course, this choice of material makes the Day-Date one of the priciest Rolex watches to own.

As always, both the Rolex Day-Date II and the Day-Date 40 collections offer iterations in yellow gold, white gold, Everose gold (Rolex’s proprietary rose gold alloy), and platinum. The gold variations come fitted with the classic fluted bezel while the platinum versions sport smooth bezels. Naturally, certain Rolex Day-Date II and Rolex Day-Date 40 watches also have the option of factory diamond-set bezels, including both round-cut and baguette-cut.

In true Rolex fashion, there are plenty of dial styles to choose from within both the Day-Date II and Rolex Day-Date 40, from various hour marker styles like Arabic numerals, Roman numerals, and diamonds to numerous colors like champagne, black, and silver. As is tradition with platinum Rolex watches, the platinum Day-Date 40 and Day-Date II models can also come with ice-blue dials. Furthermore, when Rolex introduced the Day-Date 40 in 2015, the company debuted a new laser etching process to create dial patterns including stripes, crisscross, and quadrant motifs.

Following in the footsteps of the classic Day-Date 36, the larger Day-Date watches feature a day window arching above 12 o’clock, which is available in 26 different languages. Also, the date window at 3 o’clock is magnified by a Cyclops lens protruding from the surface of the sapphire crystal above it.

rolex day-date 228239

This white gold 40mm Rolex Day-Date is out of this world. Join us as we review the Rolex Day-Date 40mm Meteorite reference # m228239-0055 228239.

A meteorite is rare. These meteorite dial Rolex watches are also hard to come by. Reserved for only some of their finest watches, Rolex features certain models with a dial hewn from a genuine meteorite. Let’s get a close encounter with one of these, shall we? Rolex watches are known for having extraordinary dials but the look and texture on these extraterrestrial meteorite dials look literally out of this world. Rolex has a history of pairing some of their most famous and noteworthy watch collections with rare materials and these dials can only be found on Platinum or 18kt gold watches. Most meteorites are usually made of either space rock or are pieces of a planetary core that eventually found their way into our orbit and drawn down to earth from our planet’s gravitational pull. Most meteorites also look like a plain old rock so where did they find meteorites that look so appealing? To answer this, we’ll go back almost two hundred years to a point in history where a Captain J.E. Alexander reported what is categorized as a Class IVA meteorite known as the “Gibeon” Meteorite in Namaqualand, Namibia. An 11.25” x 8.75” x 0.25” thick slice of the Gibeon meteorite sold at Christie’s for $11,875 USD. This can hopefully give you some context of the value. It is believed that the “Gibeon” Meteorite was part of a planetary core and has that unique crystalline crosshatch pattern which is essentially comprised of crystallized iron and nickel. This pattern can only be seen on the inside once the meteorite is sliced. This pattern is also known as the Widmanstätten pattern or Thomson structure (which may be easier to pronounce). These patterns are usually found in octahedrite iron meteorites and some pallasites. This pattern won’t appear in iron ores from planet Earth.

Whatever remains of the 26,000 KG of the Gibeon Meteorite that was found along the Great Fish River in Namibia is now under the protection of the Namibian government. Luckily, Rolex managed to procure some of this interstellar material before these protective laws were put into place.

This exquisite meteorite dial features 18kt white gold hands and baguette diamond index hour markers. The curved day indicator window is above the polished Rolex logo at the 12 o’clock position with a cyclops magnifier fused to the scratch-resistant sapphire crystal to enhance the visibility of the date window at the 3 o’clock position. The day and date switch instantly at midnight, unlike many other watches where it gradually changes. The 18kt white gold case measures 40mm in diameter (47.4mm from one lug to lug) with a 12mm case thickness. Rolex has its own foundries which allow them to cast the most exquisite alloys for their gold. Ensuring maximum luster. They use their own in-house laboratories to inspect every piece of metal they obtain to ensure maximum purity using next-generation equipment. This conjures up the popular adage: “If you want to make sure it’s done right; you need to do it yourself!”.
The case features an 18Kt white gold Twinlock crown and a fluted bezel, one of the most distinguishably ‘Rolex’ features with its wavy design. It is instantaneously recognizable and very dapper. This signature Rolex feature creates a medley of light and shadows when light hits the fluted bezel. Originally this was more of a functional design element used for gripping a rotating bezel. However, over time, this has become a premium esthetic feature on some of the more prized Rolex collections and only found in gold even on a fixed (non-rotating) bezel such as this one. The in-house self-winding caliber that is powering this magnificent timepiece is the Rolex caliber 3255 automatic movement. It has an impressive power reserve of approximately 70 hours and oscillates at a rate of 28,800 vibrations per hour. This 31-jewel movement features a blue paramagnetic Parachrom hairspring and is further protected with Rolex’s proprietary Paraflex shock absorbers. The 3255 caliber is both a COSC Certified Chronometer and a Superlative Chronometer. This means that first the movement was sent to a third-party laboratory at COSC and received its Chronometer status, a prestigious precision pedigree attesting to its accuracy of -4/+6 seconds of deviation per day. Then the caliber is then sent back to Rolex where it is cased and regulated further until it reached an accuracy rating of no less than an astonishing -2/+2 seconds per day. The bottom line is that it is a highly accurate mechanical caliber. Just like the case, the President bracelet is constructed of 18kt white gold and looks exquisite. Its links have a semi-circular shape and use a brushed finish on the outer links and a polished finish on the inner links. When fully linked, it can accommodate wrists with a wrist size of up to 8” or 20.5cm. The President bracelet is fastened with one of Rolex’s concealed folding Crown clasps. I wonder if Rolex will introduce a model with either an Oyster bracelet or a Jubilee bracelet like in the Datejust collection.

rolex day date 228206

Watches as a hobby can often be misunderstood. People who don’t have the “watch bug” can misplace our interest in design and horology and see it simply as a shallow consumer-based pursuit of status and luxury items. This is especially true of Rolex watches. No other brand in watches—maybe no other brand period— advertises status like Rolex. Within the brand, the watch model most identified as the “I made it” watch is the Day-Date. For decades, the Day-Date has been a staple on the wrists of powerful and successful people across the world. Like the watch hobby as a whole, the Day-Date is often misunderstood and reduced to just a status symbol. There’s a lot more to the Day-Date, and it’s worth taking a closer look at. Here we have two modern examples of the Day-Date—the rose gold reference 228235 and the platinum reference 228206. While they might look like the same old Day-Date you know and love, these are cutting-edge timepieces and are not to be confused for your fathers’ Day-Dates. These models were introduced at Baselworld 2015 as a replacement for the 41 mm Rolex Day-Date II. They’re still larger than the classic 36mm version, but they very much represent the model getting back to its roots. These 40mm Date-Dates restored the iconic lines and proportions that the Day-Date II had lost. These watches also brought with them a whole host of innovations that would later go on to improve the rest of the Rolex watch line.These two watches have many core traits in common but are very different-looking watches with different personalities. The rose gold model has a very traditional look to it. While the classic Day-Date material is yellow gold, there’s just something about rose gold that imbues things with a vintage quality—despite the fact that rose gold is a somewhat trendy material. Because of this, the watch is contradictorily both hip and cool while being timeless at the same time. The dial is a rich chocolate brown with a sunburst finish, and it complements the rose gold perfectly. The hands and Rolex crown are made of rose gold, but the indices are baguette-cut diamonds. This is my favorite implementation of diamonds on a watch. The diamonds certainly up the bling factor, but because they’re underneath the crystal and serve a functional role, they don’t catch onlookers’ eyes quite as much. Overall this watch is pure luxury but not in an overly showy way. It’s like a very attractive and happily married person who knows they’re turning heads, but couldn’t care less. The platinum reference 228206, however, is a very different watch. This is a distinctly modern, almost futuristic-looking Day-Date. Its clean, smooth bezel and ice blue dial are both exclusive to the platinum version, which—god forbid—prevents it from being confused with the white gold variant. This dial, too, has baguette-cut diamonds for hour indices, and while they don’t look out of place on the rose gold watch, they look perfect on this one. The combination of the ice blue dial with the cold glistening platinum makes the diamonds the most fitting choice for indices. Because it’s a light-colored metal, it has a better chance of going unnoticed to those who don’t know watches, but it will also make a much louder statement than a yellow or rose gold Rolex Day-Date for those who do. If the rose gold personifies content confidence, this platinum watch embodies being on the prowl. You can’t talk about the Day-Date without talking about the bracelet. It’s almost as legendary as the watch itself. Named the “President,” it’s only available in precious metals and is a bit of a hybrid between Rolex’s Jubilee and Oyster style bracelets combining the best of both of them. It’s a supremely comfortable but durable bracelet, and damn, is it good-looking. Historically though, this bracelet has become known for its tendency to “stretch” over time. This happens over the course of years when the metal pins grind against their sleeves and wear down. The effect of this is the bracelet looks as though it has stretched out when really it’s just metal wearing down. With these latest generation President bracelets, that problem is a thing of the past. Rolex has put ceramic on the inside of the pin sleeves, getting rid of the metal on metal contact and ensuring the bracelet stays tight and secure indefinitely. This is a small update, but it solves a problem that has long plagued Rolex bracelets, and it illustrates Rolex’s constant pursuit of perfection. Inside these two watches is the in-house caliber 3255. Though Rolex is known for small incremental changes to their watches, this movement was actually built from the ground up. Rolex claims that over 90% of the components were analyzed and reworked and that this single movement had 14 patents filed for it. One of the most important updates to this movement is the use of the Chronergy escapement, which enables the watch to operate much more efficiently and accurately. Both watches have a power reserve of 70 hours and are accuracy rated to -2/+2 seconds per day. This is bar none the most advanced, accurate, and reliable movement Rolex has ever made. The Day-Date to outsiders may seem like just a showy cocky watch, but it’s so much more than that. There’s a reason it’s graced the wrists of everyone from the President of the United States to the Dalai Lama. The Day-Date is arguably Rolex’s most innovative timepiece. Hell, it was the very first Rolex to be labeled a “Superlative Chronometer Officially Certified.” This now-standard label started on the Day-Date, and that trend of the Day-Date being a vehicle for innovation continues to this day. The advanced series of 32xx movements were first seen in these Day-Dates and are still trickling down to the rest of the Rolex line. The ceramic pin sleeves were also first seen on these watches and are now standard. That’s where the Day-Dates real value lies, in all the innovation that gets introduced through it. As goes the Day-Date so goes Rolex.