Category: Breitling Watches


Fake Breitling Premier B01 Chronograph 42 Green

The Premier collection stands out and apart from Breitling’s classic pilot and dive watches, while still leaving all its distinctive Breitling features intact. We review the flagship model of this recently launched line, with original photos by Olaf Köster.
In marked contrast to the Navitimer 1 with its instrument-like tracks around the dial, or the Chronomat with its structural unidirectional rotating bezel, the timepieces in Breitling’s Premier collection embody understatement. But if we look to the past, we can see they’re clearly identifiable as Breitling watches. Most people who choose a Breitling Premier today weren’t even born when the original Premier watches were launched in the 1940s. During that time of turmoil and new beginnings, watches in the Premier line were intended to convey reliability, value and a touch of elegance. These merits are welcome today as well and give us a chance to step away from our fast-paced world for a bit of peace and quiet.

And so the Premier collection not only recalls a different era with its name but also hits the same marks with its design as it did back in the 1940s. It is also “the first modern Breitling collection that stands for elegance in everyday life,” according to Breitling CEO Georges Kern.
Our test watch, the Replica Breitling Premier B01 Chronograph 42 Green , is the flagship of the collection. Its name makes it abundantly clear that it is equipped with Breitling manufacture movement 01, available with either a silver or blue dial with black counters. A special Bentley version is available with a British racing green dial and the Bentley Centenary Limited Edition is also available with a brown dial and a red-gold case. Our test watch was housed in stainless steel.
For the sake of clarity, let us mention here that the collection also includes chronographs with ETA/Valjoux 7750-based movements and various three-hand watches with a small seconds subdial or weekday/date displays.

Speaking of the date, on the Replica Breitling Premier B01 Chronograph 42 Green, it is easily legible at its location at 6 o’clock. Its prominent placement is made possible thanks to the reduction of displays with the chronograph movement 01, which omits the 12-hour counter and lets the offset position of the date between 4 and 5 o’clock shift to a straight up-and-down position at 6 o’clock. The two black subdials at 3 and 9 o’clock present an attractive and readable “panda” face on a white background. This bicompax arrangement places the chronograph minutes counter at 3 o’clock and a permanent small seconds subdial at 9 o’clock. This gives the Premier B01 Chronograph 42 a very balanced appearance and follows the current trend of chronographs with only two counters. Of course this only allows the timing of intervals of up to 30 minutes, but let’s be honest – who among us in these rapid-fire times needs to record extended time spans, especially since the Premier B01 Chronograph 42 was designed for “powering down.” Powering down is no problem with this Breitling manufacture movement. With its power reserve of 70 hours, the timepiece can easily be taken off the wrist and set aside for an extended “time out” without any worry of its stopping, especially since the rate results are shown to be stable despite gradually falling amplitudes. The same is true for the operation of the chronograph. The timepiece runs at an average rate of +2.4 seconds per day with amplitudes around 265 degrees. It provides chronometer-level quality in every situation, a long-standing Breitling standard for all of its timepieces.
But the Replica Breitling Premier B01 Chronograph 42 Green shows the instrumental nature Breitling is known for – more than merely chronometer performance. The center-mounted stopwatch hand has a red tip that travels around a delicate but fully legible tachymeter track, which is expertly printed on the black flange ring around the dial, and glides above the seconds track that is divided in thirds to reflect the 4-Hz rhythm of the Caliber 01 automatic movement. The precision and accuracy Breitling is known for is beautifully staged beneath a domed anti-glare sapphire crystal that reveals a certain retro charm. It is a nod to the past, just like the Premier logo on the dial: Premier models in the 1940s were the first Breitling watches to bear the product name on the dial. Its understated elegance extends even as far as the minimal application of luminous material on the hour and minutes hands – enough to barely read the time in poor lighting conditions. By contrast, legibility during the day is excellent. The watch’s sporty stainless-steel case boasts both polished and brushed-finish surfaces and is pressure-resistant and water-resistant to 10 bar (100 meters). Its 42.5-mm diameter meets current tastes – while it’s not nearly as large as other Breitling watches, it’s definitely not small. Its 13.81-mm height is not readily apparent thanks to carefully considered architecture that ensures that the watch doesn’t look overpowering. A narrow, stepped bezel and angular threaded caseback with a sapphire viewing window overlap a smaller midsection with engraved grooves along its body. The crown does not screw down and is easy to grasp and turn for manual winding, and can be pulled out smoothly and firmly into the individual operating positions. The modern-looking, elongated square pusher at 2 o’clock requires some pressure to start the chronograph function. It’s much easier to stop and reset using a similar pusher at 4 o’clock. The lugs are steep and angular; polished top surfaces add to the overall elegance of the Premier B01 Chronograph 42. It also fits well and snugly on a smaller wrist as the lugs bend downward. The leather strap is fastened to the lugs with curved spring bars. But for a larger wrist, the strap almost feels a bit too short – especially if you need to insert the prong into the last hole to fasten it. Otherwise, the solution is comfortable with side buttons to open the elegantly simple, single-sided folding clasp.

Breitling Endurance Pro Ironman World Championship

In partnership with the world-famous IRONMAN Triathlon, Breitling introduce the Endurance Pro, now including the exclusive Breitling Endurance Pro IRONMAN.

Read on to explore how Breitling unite high precision, innovative materials and the vibrant spirit of the IRONMAN Triathlon to create the ultimate athleisure timepiece.
The Breitling Endurance Pro Ironman Triathlon is one of a series of long-distance triathlon races, consisting of a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bicycle ride and a marathon 26-mile run. The Ironman is considered as one of the most challenging one-day sporting events in the world. Breitling’s Triathlon Squad have built an impressive record in IRONMAN events around the world.
German triathlete, Jan Frodeno is not only a 2008 Olympic gold medallist, but also a three-time IRONMAN World Champion and a two-time IRONMAN World Champion. In 2019, Frodeno recorded a best overall course time at the IRONMAN World Championship, winning in 7:51:13. Daniela Ryf, a native of Breitling’s home country of Switzerland, is a five-time IRONMAN 70.3 World Champion and four-time IRONMAN World Champion. The third squad member is Chris “Macca” McCormack from Australia, who has claimed two IRONMAN World Championship titles – in 2007 and again in 2010. He also won the 2012 ITU Long Distance World Championships.
Breitling and IRONMAN have come together in partnership to co-design the Breitling Endurance Pro Ironman watches, creating a series of watches which represent the pinnacle of athleisure. The Breitling Endurance Pro Ironman collection is made up of a set of perfectly lightweight and vibrant luxury sports watches which combine the best of innovation and precision with fun, colourful design. The launch features two new watches: a red version, built for sports and timekeeping enthusiasts, and a black and gold piece exclusive for IRONMAN race finishers.
The new Breitling Endurance Pro Ironman collection is built with sport and athleisure at its heart. The 44mm watch case is created using Breitlight, a material 3.3 times lighter than titanium and 5.8 times lighter than steel, but significantly harder. This pioneering material also features an impressive resistance to scratches, traction and corrosion. Its hypoallergenic and antimagnetic properties along with its thermal stability contribute to making this watch more comfortable for the wearer in comparison with traditional metals.
The IRONMAN is powered by the Breitling Caliber 82, a COSC-certified thermocompensated SuperQuartz movement that is ten times more precise than regular quartz and offers a battery life of approximately three to four years. The bidirectional rotating bezel has engraved compass points, and the tactile moulded crown provides excellent grip and allows you to wind at ease. The hour and minute hands are coated with SuperLumiNova, making them legible even in limited lighting conditions. Along with a small-second sub-dial, there are 1/10th second and 30-minute chronograph counters that have also been designed for easy reading.

Breitling Navitimer B01 Chronograph 46

For 2022, Breitling has redesigned its iconic Breitling Navitimer Chronograph watch, which for decades has been a staple of high-end tool timepieces originally designed for commercial airline pilots in the early 1950s. The Navitimer has seen countless iterations over the years and is one of the world’s most recognized luxury sports watches. It has not, however, experienced a recent makeover under Breitling’s current stewardship by Georges Kern. The updated Breitling Navitimer for 2022 is known officially as the Breitling Navitimer B01 Chronograph and comes in three case sizes with a variety of different dial options, many of which have never been offered in a Navitimer watch before. The team was able to go hands-on with all of the new Breitling Navitimer B01 Chronograph watches and below is our take on this modern version of a timeless classic.
For me, the Navitimer has always been a staple of tool watches because of its focus on computational utility. Its core design element is a slide-rule bezel that once allowed pilots to make various necessary calculations such as time to their destination or fuel consumption rate. The rotating slide-rule bezel mixed with the chronograph offered a small universe of capabilities. Only the smartest and most competent pilots would be seen wearing such a wrist instrument, and the legacy of the learned aviation professional lives on in this decidedly Breitling brand watch. With a design DNA that was perfected long ago, according to many timepiece enthusiasts, what was Breitling able to do with a modern Navitimer that hasn’t been done before?
It is important to mention some useful context at play when Breitling designed the new Navitimer. First of all, it was the brand’s goal to make the Navitimer look and feel as pleasant as possible while fitting into contemporary trends in luxury timepieces. That means the watches also need variety and be able to appeal to multiple audience sizes and color preferences. While the slide rule feature is truly iconic, few Navitimer customers are known to actually use this piece of functionality, which means the feature needs to be there but Breitling doesn’t really talk about it much. In fact, Breitling has a series of prototype Navitimer watches with more water resistance (hard to accomplish with the bezel functioning as it does). None of those ever made it to market because the resulting watch cases don’t really look “Navitimer enough.” So, Breitling’s goal with the redesigned Navitimer is mainly two-fold: to create a commercially successful luxury watch that fits into Breitling’s “relaxed luxury lifestyle” brand personality, and to offer a product that looks and feels like the classic Navitimer enthusiasts love. Note that to make the dial a bit cleaner, this generation of Breitling Navitimer Chronograph watch dials do not have a tachymeter scale, and I don’t think a single person will really miss it.
It was also important that Breitling get to feature its extremely competent in-house caliber B01 automatic chronograph movement but also to make the Navitimer case thinner. Older Navitimer watches are thinner, but they are also manually wound (versus automatic). The 2022 Navitimer watches are about 1.5mm thinner than previous-generation models, and they also feature an exhibition caseback. The case thinness (they are all about 13.6-14mm-thick, depending on the version) is thanks to a redesign of the slide-rule bezel system, which is now flat instead of sloped, as was the case on previous models. The dial doesn’t appear flat, however, thanks to the recessed subdials. Many people will not notice, at first glance, the different architecture of the Navitimer dial, but it is very apparent once you start to inspect it or compare it to other recent Breitling Navitimer Chronograph watches.
Breitling decided to go very commercial with the dials in terms of colors and finishing. That’s a business decision that probably makes sense, but purists will probably still be more attracted to some of the more historic-looking recent Navitimer watches that have more of a “tool watch” look. The various metallic colors and copious reflective surfaces test well with luxury seekers but make the new Navitimer B01 Chronograph watches quite “blingy” when compared with the classic models. Adding to that look are new colors, including two different greens (one is a fun mint), two blues, and a variety of grays, whites, and black tones mixed together. There are even 18k red-gold case options in addition to the main steel-cased versions to offer an even more high-end feel. The dials are very nice, but I prefer a more matte style to watches with this level of dial detail, and for the snazzier shiny look, I am still very much taken by Breitling’s Chronomat 42 masterpieces.
For me, the most jarring aspect of the new Breitling Navitimer B01 Chronograph case design is the polishing. While not always true, most recent Navitimer watches have had all-polished cases — really nice polished cases. For 2022, Breitling goes a different route by maintaining the core Navitimer case style but offering both polished and brushed surface finishing over the case and the available bracelet. This adds a lot of visual interest to the case and bracelet, but the dual-finishing of the 2022 Navitimer watches do make them stand out from the rest of the modern versions of the watch and will probably help them stand out to customers who have previous-generation Navitimer models.
On the dial, we see a return to the AOPA Breitling “wings” logo, which has been used on some retro-remake models but no standard collection pieces, until now. Breitling CEO Georges Kern presided over the Navitimer B01 Chronograph launch event and explained something very interesting about the brand’s logos. The problem is that none of the current logos work with all of the watches. Some logos appear better on the modern watches but not the classic ones. Some of the watches have just a Breitling “B,” and others have mere graphic logos. It is great that Breitling has so much history to pull from to make this possible, but it is also interesting that the brand’s current logos don’t actually work well on all watches. Breitling isn’t the only watch brand now to play with different logo designs on contemporary watches but probably has the best reasons to use multiple logos across product collections.
To serve the needs of various customers (including women), Breitling made the correct decision to offer what is essentially the same watch in three different case sizes. It is true that some dial color configurations are only available in some sizes, but for the most part, Breitling makes sure that the 41, 43, and 46mm-wide Navitimer B01 Chronograph watches are more or less the same in terms of style and look. Having worn all three sizes, I would say that my personal preference is the 43mm wide version, but I would gladly wear any of them. The cases are water-resistant to 30 meters, and 13.6, 13.69, and 13.95mm thick, respectively. Watch size is a matter of taste and not a matter of correctness. So the correct size for you will depend on your anatomy and, to a degree, the watch dial colors that you prefer.
Breitling’s B01 automatic chronograph movement powers each of these watches and, for the first time in a Navitimer Chronograph piece, you can see the very nice movement through an exhibition caseback. This was designed by former Rolex engineers who worked on the chronograph movement inside the Daytona and is very accurate. Each is a COSC-certified Chronometer and operates at 4Hz with 70 hours of power reserve. The watch features the time and date (integrated into the lower subdial), as well as the 12-hour chronograph. All of the watches are available on a brown or black alligator strap, or a matching seven-link metal bracelet (steel or gold depending on the version). The bracelet option (in steel) costs just $400 more and also features a new butterfly-style deployant clasp, a serious upgrade from the previous fold-over deployant clasps.
The new for 2022 Breitling Navitimer B01 Chronograph comes just in time for the 70th anniversary of the original Navitimer from 1952. The collection is as dazzling and handsome as ever, while Breilting hopes the invigorated new colors and styling will help the thinking person’s tool watch appeal to a more general luxury audience. There are no fewer than 15 new versions available at launch, and the full pricing for all of the latest Breitling B01 Chronograph watches

Breitling Navitimer B01 Chronograph 41

It’s iconic. It’s complicated. It’s the Breitling Navitimer. Without a doubt, the Navitimer is Breitling’s flagship model. When you think of Breitling, an image of the circular slide rule bezel surrounding three subdials is the first thing likely to pop into your head.

My dad and I always talk about space and aviation. It’s been a staple topic of conversation since I was a little kid. Aerospace has been my dad’s passion since he was a child. Over many decades he’s passed that same interest on to me. Whenever I mention the Omega Speedmaster to him, my dad quickly reminds me (in the way dads do), “…you know? The Navitimer is the real space watch.”
There is an element of truth in that statement. Dads are usually right and modern marketing is not always consistent with history. Omega wasn’t the first to market watches with astronauts just as the United States space program didn’t start with a Moon landing. A vintage Breitling advertising campaign depicts the (at the time) larger-than-life NASA Astronaut Scott Carpenter. Scott Carpenter famously wore the Breitling Cosmonaut-Navitimer (24hr dial) on the NASA mission Mercury-Atlas 7 (May 24th, 1962). This took place seven years before the Moon landing.

Throughout many iterations since its commercial release in 1952, the Breitling Navitimer continues to retain most of its original design and functional elements. Is there a modern place for yesterday’s analog pilot’s tool in today’s upscale modern life? As a fashion item, sure, but what about as a useful tool? To assess the Navitimer B01 we will look at the watch with a critical eye, but we will also provide instructions for operating the watch’s slide rule bezel in order to focus on its often overlooked functionality as a tool.
Unlike most watches that I have the opportunity to review, I wore this one for almost a month straight to make sure that I got the full experience. I had this weird preconceived notion that I could never be a Navitimer Person, whatever the hell that is. After about two weeks, the Breitling Navitimer B01 felt fully integrated into my daily kit. I missed my Rolexes and Speedmasters, but it was clear to me why the Navitimer has remained a popular watch for decades.

Within the entire Breitling Navitimer line, my personal money would be on the “806” 1959 Re-Edition ($8,600), because of the vintage characteristics such as painted indices, hand-wound movement, beaded bezel, etc. If it’s someone else’s money to play with, the 1959 Edition in Platinum and blue ($39,900) would be superlative, because nothing defies constitution like a precious metal tool watch. But the B01 in hand for review was really a fantastic introduction into the Navitimer experience because there is a genuine connection that bridges modern watchmaking with an iconic representation of the past.
Any watch over 40mm sends my guard up. Will it feel too big? Are the proportions going to be OK? I’m pleased to say that the 43mm Navitimer that Breitling loaned me put my anxiety to rest. I’ll save you the “wears smaller” lines and simply point out that I have a 6.75” wrist that’s relatively flat across the top. It’s hard to imagine the larger 46mm version working for me, but the 43mm Navitimer fits great.
The Navitimer bezel sticks out like jagged teeth overhanging the case. The 43mm width is measured by the diameter of the bezel, not the case beneath it, and that’s key in understanding why this watch wears smaller. The action of the friction bezel is remarkably smooth compared to a dive watch, which tend to provide greater resistance in the bezel’s ratchet mechanism. The teeth on the Navitimer bezel are so pronounced that I actually scratched my son as he slid out of my arms while setting him down. Maybe this is not the best watch for child handling, but with aviation gloves on the bezel is easy to grip.

I’m a sucker for exposed pump pushers and crowns on chronographs. The pump pushers reinforce the nostalgic feeling of the Navitimer.

The entire Navitimer case is polished. After all, most traditional Breitling designs were quite shiny, and that continues to be a signature look of the brand. Luckily the black dial ate up a lot of the light, so it wasn’t overly shiny on wrist. Moving to the flanks of the Navitimer’s case, the lugs retain that high polish while sloping down at just the right angle for a comfortable fit.
The Navitimer’s caseback displays the Breitling B01 movement and reminds you that 3 Bars of water resistance means that the Navitimer is not a great choice for the pool. It’s actually a poor choice for any water activity. The crown does not screw down, and the rating just isn’t there. However, this watch was designed for use in thin atmospheres at very high altitudes, so pressurizing the case would have been pointless, difficult, and would likely have enlarged the watch to ridiculous proportions.

The Breitling Navitimer B01 features a domed (Breitling calls it cambered) sapphire crystal. I would describe the amount of camber as just enough to be visually interesting without causing too much distortion. The Navitimer crystal has anti-glare treatment on both sides. Breitling’s anti-glare treatment gives the glass a quick flash of magenta at a certain angle. Photographers love to show that little bit of color off on social media posts (I’m guilty). You won’t see a lot of lume photos due to the sparing amount Super-LumiNova on the Navitimer B01 dial, however. This is a watch intended to be used in bright light and with perfect eyesight.
The Navitimer that Breitling lent me for review came on a black calfskin leather strap with a tang-type buckle. The leather strap felt substantial between the Navitimer’s 22mm wide lugs. Breitling wisely chose a thick leather to back up the proportions of the 43mm Navitimer. The calfskin strap tapered from 22mm to 18mm at the buckle and was slightly padded. In the interest of full disclosure, I swapped the Breitling strap for a Barton Silicone Elite because I don’t care for leather. That is just a personal preference and does not take away from the high-quality Breitling leather strap. With the five options listed above, you can find something you’ll like, for sure.

Breitling Navitimer Automatic 41 Replica

The Breitling Navitimer is easily one of the most respected pilot’s watches on the market. First conceived in the 1950s, these watches were no-nonsense tools meant to help a pilot calculate ground speed or fuel consumption on the fly (hah). The Breitling Navitimer 1 Automatic 41 watch was an effort on the brand’s part to blend some of the expected Navitimer features into a highly functional timepiece, all the while maintaining that classic design we know and love. The Navitimer 1 draws much of its inspiration from the Navitimer 806, a simple three-hander released in the 1950s. The Breitling Navitimer 1 Automatic 41 is being released in two different 41mm-case versions. The first is an all stainless steel construction, and the second has a stainless steel case but is accompanied by an 18k red gold bezel. (Previously, these were only available in 38mm, seen here.) The Stainless steel version will be available in one of three dial colors: black, blue, and silver, whereas the red gold bezel version will be available with a silver or anthracite dial. The watch will be powered by Breitling’s chronometer-certified Caliber 17, which ticks away at 4hz and boasts a 38-hour power reserve. The watch is resistant to 3bar (30 meters) and will be available on either an alligator strap or a stainless steel bracelet.
This seems like a nice generation of the Navitimer. It’s firmly rooted in Breitling’s best-known strand of DNA, but has been modernized and sized appropriately in an attempt to widen appeal. Sized at 41mm, it will be appropriate for a wide array of wrist sizes for those who might have found the previous version a little small. The dial layout retains the information-packed aesthetic of other Navitimers but has been balanced well with the date placement at 6 o’clock. I do expect a greater power reserve from an in-house movement from Breitling. It seems to me that 38 hours is particularly low, when 72-hour power reserves are almost becoming table stakes these days. Even the Breitling B01 movement has stretched out to approximately 70 hours.

Breitling Navitimer B01 Chronograph 43

For 2022, Breitling has redesigned its iconic Breitling Navitimer Chronograph watch, which for decades has been a staple of high-end tool timepieces originally designed for commercial airline pilots in the early 1950s. The Navitimer has seen countless iterations over the years and is one of the world’s most recognized luxury sports watches. It has not, however, experienced a recent makeover under Breitling’s current stewardship by Georges Kern. The updated Breitling Navitimer for 2022 is known officially as the Breitling Navitimer B01 Chronograph and comes in three case sizes with a variety of different dial options, many of which have never been offered in a Navitimer watch before. The aBlogtoWatch team was able to go hands-on with all of the new Breitling Navitimer B01 Chronograph watches and below is our take on this modern version of a timeless classic.
For me, the Navitimer has always been a staple of tool watches because of its focus on computational utility. Its core design element is a slide-rule bezel that once allowed pilots to make various necessary calculations such as time to their destination or fuel consumption rate. The rotating slide-rule bezel mixed with the chronograph offered a small universe of capabilities. Only the smartest and most competent pilots would be seen wearing such a wrist instrument, and the legacy of the learned aviation professional lives on in this decidedly Breitling brand watch. With a design DNA that was perfected long ago, according to many timepiece enthusiasts, what was Breitling able to do with a modern Navitimer that hasn’t been done before?
It is important to mention some useful context at play when Breitling designed the new Navitimer. First of all, it was the brand’s goal to make the Navitimer look and feel as pleasant as possible while fitting into contemporary trends in luxury timepieces. That means the watches also need variety and be able to appeal to multiple audience sizes and color preferences. While the slide rule feature is truly iconic, few Navitimer customers are known to actually use this piece of functionality, which means the feature needs to be there but Breitling doesn’t really talk about it much. In fact, Breitling has a series of prototype Navitimer watches with more water resistance (hard to accomplish with the bezel functioning as it does). None of those ever made it to market because the resulting watch cases don’t really look “Navitimer enough.” So, Breitling’s goal with the redesigned Navitimer is mainly two-fold: to create a commercially successful luxury watch that fits into Breitling’s “relaxed luxury lifestyle” brand personality, and to offer a product that looks and feels like the classic Navitimer enthusiasts love. Note that to make the dial a bit cleaner, this generation of Breitling Navitimer Chronograph watch dials do not have a tachymeter scale, and I don’t think a single person will really miss it.
It was also important that Breitling get to feature its extremely competent in-house caliber B01 automatic chronograph movement but also to make the Navitimer case thinner. Older Navitimer watches are thinner, but they are also manually wound (versus automatic). The 2022 Navitimer watches are about 1.5mm thinner than previous-generation models, and they also feature an exhibition caseback. The case thinness (they are all about 13.6-14mm-thick, depending on the version) is thanks to a redesign of the slide-rule bezel system, which is now flat instead of sloped, as was the case on previous models. The dial doesn’t appear flat, however, thanks to the recessed subdials. Many people will not notice, at first glance, the different architecture of the Navitimer dial, but it is very apparent once you start to inspect it or compare it to other recent Navitimer Chronograph watches.
Breitling decided to go very commercial with the dials in terms of colors and finishing. That’s a business decision that probably makes sense, but purists will probably still be more attracted to some of the more historic-looking recent Navitimer watches that have more of a “tool watch” look. The various metallic colors and copious reflective surfaces test well with luxury seekers but make the new Navitimer B01 Chronograph watches quite “blingy” when compared with the classic models. Adding to that look are new colors, including two different greens (one is a fun mint), two blues, and a variety of grays, whites, and black tones mixed together. There are even 18k red-gold case options in addition to the main steel-cased versions to offer an even more high-end feel. The dials are very nice, but I prefer a more matte style to watches with this level of dial detail, and for the snazzier shiny look, I am still very much taken by Breitling’s Chronomat 42 masterpieces.
For me, the most jarring aspect of the new Breitling Navitimer B01 Chronograph case design is the polishing. While not always true, most recent Navitimer watches have had all-polished cases — really nice polished cases. For 2022, Breitling goes a different route by maintaining the core Navitimer case style but offering both polished and brushed surface finishing over the case and the available bracelet. This adds a lot of visual interest to the case and bracelet, but the dual-finishing of the 2022 Navitimer watches do make them stand out from the rest of the modern versions of the watch and will probably help them stand out to customers who have previous-generation Navitimer models.
On the dial, we see a return to the AOPA Breitling “wings” logo, which has been used on some retro-remake models but no standard collection pieces, until now. Breitling CEO Georges Kern presided over the Navitimer B01 Chronograph launch event and explained something very interesting about the brand’s logos. The problem is that none of the current logos work with all of the watches. Some logos appear better on the modern watches but not the classic ones. Some of the watches have just a Breitling “B,” and others have mere graphic logos. It is great that Breitling has so much history to pull from to make this possible, but it is also interesting that the brand’s current logos don’t actually work well on all watches. Breitling isn’t the only watch brand now to play with different logo designs on contemporary watches but probably has the best reasons to use multiple logos across product collections.
To serve the needs of various customers (including women), Breitling made the correct decision to offer what is essentially the same watch in three different case sizes. It is true that some dial color configurations are only available in some sizes, but for the most part, Breitling makes sure that the 41, 43, and 46mm-wide Navitimer B01 Chronograph watches are more or less the same in terms of style and look. Having worn all three sizes, I would say that my personal preference is the 43mm wide version, but I would gladly wear any of them. The cases are water-resistant to 30 meters, and 13.6, 13.69, and 13.95mm thick, respectively. Watch size is a matter of taste and not a matter of correctness. So the correct size for you will depend on your anatomy and, to a degree, the watch dial colors that you prefer.
Breitling’s B01 automatic chronograph movement powers each of these watches and, for the first time in a Navitimer Chronograph piece, you can see the very nice movement through an exhibition caseback. This was designed by former Rolex engineers who worked on the chronograph movement inside the Daytona and is very accurate. Each is a COSC-certified Chronometer and operates at 4Hz with 70 hours of power reserve. The watch features the time and date (integrated into the lower subdial), as well as the 12-hour chronograph. All of the watches are available on a brown or black alligator strap, or a matching seven-link metal bracelet (steel or gold depending on the version). The bracelet option (in steel) costs just $400 more and also features a new butterfly-style deployant clasp, a serious upgrade from the previous fold-over deployant clasps.
The new for 2022 Breitling Navitimer B01 Chronograph comes just in time for the 70th anniversary of the original Navitimer from 1952. The collection is as dazzling and handsome as ever, while Breilting hopes the invigorated new colors and styling will help the thinking person’s tool watch appeal to a more general luxury audience. There are no fewer than 15 new versions available at launch, and the full pricing for all of the latest Breitling B01 Chronograph watches

Breitling Chronomat B01 42

This week Breitling updated one of its most iconic watches and by doing so harnessed its previous glory. Welcome to the new Breitling Chronomat B01 42. This re-release was inspired by the original Chronomat design that put Breitling on the map with the watch community. I’ll admit, over the last 5 years my interest in the Breitling brand has dwindled and nothing they released really connected with me as a watch enthusiast. That has now officially changed. There is a lot to discuss about the new Breitling Chronomat B01 42 so let’s dive in! The most noticeable change with the new Breitling Chronomat B01 42 is that it reverted back to its original bracelet. Personally I think this is one of the most stunning features about this watch. Understandably, anything that is bold is likely to draw mixed attention. The bullet bracelet is one of those features that you’ll either love or hate, not much in-between.
The new Breitling Chronomat B01 42 is an all-purpose sports watch that recalls the return of mechanical timekeeping in the 1980s and Breitling’s role as a chronograph pioneer. The unique Rouleaux bracelet brings a trendy retro look to the wrist, while modern manufacture Caliber 01 points the way toward the future. We review it in this feature from our March-April 2021 issue.
When Breitling relaunched the Chronomat in 1984, it sent a clear signal — it heralded the return of the mechanical watch, which had all but disappeared during the Quartz Crisis of the 1970s. Breitling had already used the name “Chronomat” in the 1940s, as a combination of “chronograph” for the stopwatch function and “mathematics” for the slide rule, which would later become the hallmark of the Navitimer. But in 1984, the term gained additional meaning: the first two syllables continued to refer to “chronograph” for the stop-time function, but now the third syllable alluded to “automatic” for the mechanical automatic movement that drove the timepiece, at a time when quartz watches were the order of the day. Originally, Valjoux Caliber 7750, which had been launched in 1973 and whose production was later resumed by ETA, provided the power. The version used by Breitling had undergone various specific modifications.

Another quarter of a century would pass before Breitling Chronomat B01 42 launched its own chronograph movement. Caliber 01 premiered in 2009 inside the prestigious Chronomat. This robust caliber is almost taken for granted nowadays and is hard at work, in various modifications, inside numerous Breitling chronographs, so we’d like to remind our readers of a few of its remarkable qualities

Breitling Premier Top Time Triumph

The Breitling Premier Top Time Triumph, Breitling’s entry into the popular steel-sports-watch-with-ice-blue-dial trend, is a top contender for two reasons. First, you can get it, compared to other entries by, say, Rolex or Patek Philippe. Secondly, it’s priced right, at $5,500, or $5,700 for the limited edition. Aside from that, it has an in-house chronograph movement, a unique design, and there is a cool ice-blue Triumph motorcycle to go with it.
Breitling’s Top Time line is distinctive for its bi-compax, subdial configuration, nicknamed the “Zorro” by collectors because of its resemblance to the famous swordsman’s half-face mask. The Breitling Premier Top Time Triumph collection is dedicated to vintage autos and motorcycles, with previous models named for the Ford Mustang, the Chevrolet Corvette and the Shelby Cobra. This one is an homage to Triumph motorcycles, and there will be a limited edition of 270 co-branded motorcycles – the Speed Twin Breitling Premier Top Time Triumph Limited Edition – whose buyers will have the opportunity to buy a special owner’s version of the Breitling Top Time Triumph. A sunray dial and an engraved caseback featuring the individual number of the bike will differentiate it from the regular edition.
The watch was also inspired by something called cafe-racer culture. In the mid-1960s, a subculture sprang up around “cafe racers,” stylish motorcycles that were used to transport their riders from one hip cafe to another. Brand founder Willy Breitling introduced the Top Time as an homage to the culture, with an unconventional chronograph designed for young and active professionals. The unique color of the new model’s dial has two references: a blue Triumph Thunderbird 6T from 1951 and a rare, blue-dialed Breitling Premier Top Time Triumph, Ref. 815, from the 1970s.
The Breitling and Triumph logos share the dial, one at 12 o’clock and the other at 6, and the casebacks are etched with a detailed design sketch of Triumph’s parallel twin engine. Oversized mushroom pushers are vintage-y looking, and allow for easy control of the chronograph stop-start-reset functions. It contains the Breitling caliber 23 with a 48-hour power reserve, and comes on a black racing-themed (perforated) leather strap.

Replica Breitling Superocean Heritage II 42

The 1950s were a watershed decade for dive watches, if you’ll forgive the pun. Within a few years of each other, three different companies released three of the most enduring classics of the modern dive watch idiom: the Rolex Submariner, the Blancpain Fifty Fathoms, and the Omega Seamaster 300. All had certain essential features in common – excellent visibility, rotating timing bezels, good water resistance – and each has gone on to become an icon for the company that made it. In 1957, another classic of the era debuted: the Breitling Superocean, which was released in both chronograph and non-chronograph versions.
Early Breitling Superocean Heritage II 42 watches have gone on to become very collectible – the first two references, in good condition, are now high five-figure timepieces (nothing like the crazy money being spent on rare Submariners, but still very respectable). This year is the 60th anniversary of the Superocean, and to mark the occasion Breitling has released a new version of the watch which looks back to the originals for its design cues, while at the same time looking very much forward from a technical standpoint – including the movement, which is being supplied to Breitling by Tudor (with modifications).
There are two sizes available for the new model – 42mm and 46mm, with a 46mm chronograph available as well – and all three models are available in brown, blue, or black. We had the blue and brown models in the office and the brown model on a strap was the one I wore for a week. The blue version on a steel mesh bracelet is just as handsome as the brown model, and for the same reasons: clarity of design and great depth of color. I can only assume the black model would be just as handsome, although the rich colors of the dials and bezels for the blue and brown models is hard to pass up, if you’re going to go for color in a dive watch at all. (Officially, the colors are “copperhead bronze” and “gun blue,” per Breitling).
The strap on the brown version is rubber-lined leather and it’s quite thick, giving every impression of being nearly as durable as the steel mesh bracelet. Ordinarily, I would prefer something a little less heavy, but as the 42mm Héritage Superocean watches are 14.35mm thick, the strap works well and actually harmonizes better with the overall feel of the watch than would a thinner strap (for comparison, the Tudor Black Bay is about 14.8mm thick).
Fit and finish on this sub-$5,000 watch is very good indeed. The hands and dial markers pick up light beautifully and the Superocean is, as it should be, instantly legible under pretty much any lighting conditions you’d care to throw at it (including total darkness). Aside from legibility, though, it struck me during the time I wore it as a genuinely beautiful watch, with a kind of elegance I’ve missed in some of Breitling’s more recent creations. The shapes of the hands and indexes, as well as the warm richness and saturation of the dial and bezel colors, goes to show you that making an aesthetically nuanced tool watch needn’t be an oxymoron (I still can’t quite believe I’m describing a Breitling as “aesthetically nuanced,” but there you have it). The bezel feels slightly stiff, dropping into half-minute stops as you rotate it; the upside of a certain degree of resistance, of course, is that you feel when you set the bezel that it’s not going anywhere.
One of the most interesting aspects of the Breitling Superocean Heritage II 42 watches is what’s under the hood – in this case, the Breitling caliber B20. This is sort of an in-house movement, and sort of not; it’s based on the Tudor caliber MT5612, which was first introduced by Tudor in the Pelagos. There are some differences between the MT5612, as used by Tudor, and the B20 – for one thing, the B20 has somewhat more traditional finishing than MT5612, which has an almost modernist look, with bead-blasted bridges rather than the Geneva stripes used in the Breitling version. The other major difference is that the B20 doesn’t have a silicon balance spring, which means less resistance to magnetic fields. However, a lot of the value of the movement is still there. The B20 is, like the caliber MT5612, a tough movement designed for hard use, with a balance bridge (providing somewhat better protection against shock) and a freesprung, adjustable mass balance – and, of course, a 70 hour power reserve.
Because of the closed caseback, you can’t see the movement, which is a bit of a shame, but you can definitely tell it’s there from the performance of the watch. Certainly, this chronometer-certified caliber came through in daily use – I’d expect the watch to drift a little on its rate over time but at least during the one week period I wore it, it gained exactly one second per day, which is stellar performance by any standard. Wider use by Breitling of this movement (and I can only assume they’ll deploy it elsewhere in the next year or two) would make a significant change in how potential buyers evaluate the value proposition of Breitling watches.
This version of the Breitling Superocean Heritage II 42 watches will run you $4,500 (the blue dial version on the mesh bracelet isn’t much more expensive, at $4,700). After a week with the brown dial version I really felt like there’s a lot on offer from Breitling with this one. The aesthetics are really compelling (it’s one of the more handsome new dive watches out this year, for sure). And with a ceramic bezel, a very nicely made strap with a well-engineered bracelet, and that caliber B20 inside – which gave nothing short of excellent performance during the week I had it, and which has some very nice technical bells and whistles going for it – Breitling has here a very serious new contender in the $5,000 and under dive watch category. Definitely worth a serious look, and a great deal of what you get in more expensive dive watches, for several thousand less.

Breitling Superocean Heritage ’57

Breitling has had a truly strong showing this year. Just look at the Breitling Top Time Limited Edition released a few weeks back, and you can see that they really have the vintage-inspired aesthetic nailed down. With the new Breitling Superocean Heritage ’57 Capsule Collection, Breitling has taken the Superocean into some gnarly waves with a throwback design tailor-made for the beach or The Beach Boys. 
With this watch, Breitling has maintained the general design from the existing Heritage Superocean line, but infused some real 1950s and ’60s heritage into it. One of the first things that popped out to me was the concave bezel. This may sound crazy, but it almost gives off a 50s B-movie flying saucer vibe and adds a real flair to the retro design. On top of that is the completely re-designed marker set on the dial. Gone are the sticks and small lume pips. Here, rather, we have some very groovy overlaid stick and lume-filled circular markers at 12, three, six, and nine o’clock. The hash marks on the minute track have been elongated which I think really brings the whole design together. Always a sucker for typography, the numerals have also been given a more throwback styling, including the much-beloved flat four. 
Something that a lot of brands do when looking to the past for inspiration is rely too heavily on exactitude of execution. What I mean is that many times, the reproductions will utilize the same materials as their inspiration, which can prove to be a hindrance in modern application. Breitling has managed to combine vintage design and style with modern mechanics and materials. There is no clearer example of this than on the bezel. The concave design is in true vintage form, but it is made in ceramic which makes it robust and scratch-resistant for today’s world. 
One of the more welcome design choices on this watch is the lack of a date window. I have nothing against them personally, but when it comes to dive watches, there is a certain symmetry that shines on a no-date watch. The watch comes in a black dial or blue dial variant, both in steel with an either blue or black ceramic bezel. There is also a black dial version done in two-tone steel and red gold. While these are not limited editions, or numbered, they are only offered for a limited time and in a limited volume.

But wait, there’s more.  Breitling Superocean Heritage ’57  is also releasing a special limited edition variant of the watch. This version will have a black dial, steel case, and oh so much more. The hour markers on this LE are done in a rainbow graduation and, unlike the other pieces in the collection, this watch will be limited to a number of 250 watches (with a special caseback engraving) and will be a boutique exclusive. 
Each of these watches is equipped with the Breitling Caliber 10 movement which is a modified version of the ETA 2892, and each has chronometer certification, as is expected from the brand. The watches are paired on either leather straps or the Superocean signature mesh bracelet. For the Superocean Heritage ’57 Capsule LE, you will be able to separately purchase special Outerknown ECONYL yarn NATO straps in a variety of color combinations. 

These  Breitling Superocean Heritage ’57  may be limited in one sense or another, but they really show a recognition, on the part of the brand, of what consumers are looking for in a no-nonsense dive watch with vintage appeal, built like a modern watch. The rainbow graduations on the limited edition may seem like a lot, and they probably are, but what’s wrong with having a little fun? In a world where dive watches, bezels, and dials have become quite homogenous, Breitling has delivered a very unique offering. The watches themselves have nailed the mid-century design motif, and in doing so, are quite compelling in more ways than one. 

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